1-20 of 44 Search Results for

harlem

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 32–62.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Emily J. Orlando This essay examines Harlem Renaissance novelist Nella Larsen’s career-long conversation with the fiction of Edith Wharton. Although Larsen cared little for the suggestion that she “had gone to Mrs. Wharton for her lessons in writing,” likely because the comparison cast doubt on the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 115–140.
Published: 01 June 2017
... published novels, The Hit (1957), The Long Night (1958), and The Grand Parade (1961), as well as some of his essays, plays, and other unpublished work written in the 1960s and 1970s after his move from Harlem to Ghana, I describe an “alternative civil rights literature” not set in the South or primarily...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 92–95.
Published: 01 March 2006
... idealists. For much of the early twentieth century, whether in pre-Negri- tude Paris or in renaissance Harlem, black intellectuals took up multiple banners of internationalism—sometimes to underscore homegrown racism, sometimes to resist the dehumanizing effects of colonial oppres­ sion...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 117–140.
Published: 01 March 2012
... obviously owes something to the American hardboiled pulp tradi- tion as well, and Himes’s Harlem Domestic novels specifically have been criticized for reveling in comparable depictions of carnivalesque violence, without any cathartic, empathetic identification with suffering, hurt bod- ies. However...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 417–423.
Published: 01 September 2015
... attention to his 1960s poetry in De Mayor of Harlem (1970) especially significant. The Umbra poets, associated with Umbra magazine and the Umbra Workshop in the early 1960s, included such writers as Ishmael Reed, Tom Dent, Calvin C. Hernton, Askia Muhammad Touré, and Lorenzo Thomas. As Thomas (2008...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 481–512.
Published: 01 December 2014
... the generation of black South Africans who came of age in the mid-twentieth century.1 The art and writing of the Harlem Renaissance was especially important to the rise of a new generation of black South African writers. The very first issue of the highly influentialDrum Magazine, for example...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 22–41.
Published: 01 March 2006
... retained in some way a racial essence or character that preceded modernity. The New Negro was as old as Africa but as contemporary as a jazz club in urban Harlem; his racial soul was as ancient as Hughes’s “dusky rivers” (Voices 155) yet as modern as the Garvey’s Black Star Line ships ready to take...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 247–254.
Published: 01 June 2008
... “the African American in the Harlem Renaissance was so mobile and interactive with others in the community that the personal vision of life became impersonal, objective, and free of egotism” (84).This thesis stands in contradiction to the more polyvalent idea that the Harlem Renaissance...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 388–419.
Published: 01 September 2003
... this temporality, and elaborates on its causes, in his essay “Harlem Is Nowhere.” Written as Ellison worked on the manuscript for Invisible Man, “Harlem Is Nowhere” proposes that American Negroes are caught in a vast process of change that has swept them from slavery to the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 504–512.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Harlem Renaissance,” offers a reading of Jean Toomer’s Cane and Langston Hughes’s The Weary Blues and Fine Clothes to the Jew, as well as the Harlem Renaissance more generally. Graham deftly avoids the sort of reductive reading that simply states the importance of music to the Harlem Renaissance...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 357–377.
Published: 01 September 2009
..., limited the the way the novel was read. Like Home to Harlem before it, Banjo did not shy away from representing the “lower” pleasures in life: sex, drinking, gambling, and dancing.8 The risqué content of the novel became the central focus of critical opinion, and its formal innovations were...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 396–400.
Published: 01 September 2008
.... Rukeyser’s West Virginia, Bishop’s Key West, Hughes’s Harlem, Brooks’s Chicago, McGrath’s North Dakota, and Op- pen’s New York thus, in Lowney’s view, represent radically different poetic perspectives on a shared experience of social crisis. Indeed, because of the notable geographical span of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 191–212.
Published: 01 June 2017
... Southern woman, famously glossed Harlem nightlife as the “logical outcome of Appomattox” (1996, 169). The splendor of everyday African American culture in the urban North forces Brown’s narrator to reflect on the failures of the Confederacy. In comparison, Stein’s hero-worship of Grant seems like a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 428–435.
Published: 01 September 2010
... them to conform too simplistically to established terms or leaving them bound by the limit- ing strictures of discourses of authenticity? In Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance Houston A. Baker quite self-consciously used an image from The Great Gatsby to demonstrate how African Americans...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2000
... explored” (20). 6 “Jean Toomer and the Afro-American Literary Tradition” and “Jean Toomer and the Writers of the Harlem Renaissance.” 7 These schematic readings of Cane form the bulk of the nonbiographical Toomer criticism. For representative examples, see Bell, Fischer, Innes, and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 37–78.
Published: 01 March 2013
... incommensurate lexicons, temporali- ties, and cultures of colonial modernity.6 In The Dialect of Modernism, Michael North reads McKay’s dialect poetry as part of a larger account of how modernist writers, both “transat- lantic” white writers (Stein, Pound, Eliot) and black writers of the Harlem...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 75–93.
Published: 01 March 2017
... like to express my gratitude to Anita Patterson for her invaluable guidance during the development of this article. 1 I am indebted to some earlier essays that offer admirable models for such a comparison, for example, Gary Edward Holcomb’s “ The Sun Also Rises in Queer Black Harlem...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 213–219.
Published: 01 June 2017
... comprehensive collections, but each requires supplemental readings in key traditions and periods (spirituals, dialect, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts movement, post-civil rights era). I generally forego the poetry collections in favor of the Norton Anthology of African American Literature , which...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 191–214.
Published: 01 June 2002
... exploit­ ed politically and economically, Harlem is the scene and symbol of the Negro’s perpetual alienation in the land of his birth” (“Harlem” 296). He agreed that Bigger represents the social product of that alienation, but argued that at a symbolic level, Bigger has an unfortunately reac­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 688–693.
Published: 01 December 2012
... among others). As Olwell does note, however, once more mystical notions of racial genius were often now imagined anew in more purportedly scientific terms. Unsurprisingly, then, Olwell in the equally excellent chapter that fol- lows shows the Harlem Renaissance writer Jessie Fauset writing a...