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gothic

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 213–237.
Published: 01 June 2012
...Ann Mattis Copyright © Hofstra University 2012 Gothic Interiority and Servants in Wharton’s A Backward Glance and “The Lady’s Maid’s Bell” Gothic Interiority and Servants in Wharton’s A Backward Glance and “The Lady’s Maid’s Bell” Ann Mattis In the “Autobiographical Postscript” to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Emily James This essay explores the inkblot as a modernist motif, from gothic children’s rhymes to the unlikely source material for Hermann Rorschach’s psychoanalytic measures. In the work of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, the ephemeral trappings of pen and ink give rise to wayward, even...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 193–213.
Published: 01 June 2000
... particularly, if peculiarly, Gothic. Susan J. Rosowski has interpreted Cather’s novels in terms of both posi­ tive and negative romanticism and has suggested that the Gothicism within Cather’s novels works to create moments where “irresolution” dominates tone and content and where “the irrational” can...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 125–129.
Published: 01 March 2009
... gothic. Still, Duck gives some useful readings, explaining, for example, how local colorists set out to critique marginalization and racist stereotypes of the South but were received as racist disavowals of racism in the nation at large. Her exami­ nation of D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 215–238.
Published: 01 June 2002
... smugness that comes out of this, a note of provincialism, often of chauvinism. Even a sort of race prejudice emerges. (“Evil” 12) Where evil occurs in the English novel, it is located on the continent, in dirty old abroad, in the gothic novel. The association of the gothic (low culture...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 391–422.
Published: 01 December 2011
... the relation her fiction maintains to that tradition as a whole, a relation that can best be described as gothic. While The Keep (2006) makes this gothic aspect explicit, it is Look at Me that provides the more interesting case study of postmodern inheritance. This is because Look at Me plays...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 111–119.
Published: 01 March 2018
... its Gothic cinematic form. Evoking such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Metropolis (1927), Ambler’s “[circuitous] train journeys, undulating streets, buildings and rooms and dank, blind and twisted passageways signify the autocratic policies of fascistic greed, the flaccid politics...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 223–246.
Published: 01 June 2018
...” ( Knish and Morgan 1916a , xii). In the first stanza, its speaker proclaims, “I have seen the grey stars marching, /And the green bubbles in wine, /And there are Gothic vaults of sleep” (4), and from this dreamlike atmosphere the second stanza then introduces the poem’s central metaphor: My cathedral...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 218–223.
Published: 01 June 2007
... text by Attridge’s definition: its inventiveness exceeds earlier conventions, and it has had an afterlife that suggests it was not bound by the conditions of its original production and reception. Second, it is a remarkable novel that has played a part in the founding of the gothic genre, yet...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 460–483.
Published: 01 December 2015
... as a gothic repository of colonial violations and an emblem of the postcolonial irrelevance of the Anglo-Irish Ascendancy. 1 In works not set exclusively in Ireland, such as The House in Paris and The Heat of the Day , Ireland serves as a place where everyday existence is suspended and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 453–469.
Published: 01 December 2000
... postapocalyptic chaos: “a lurid Gothic darkness,” an “entropic order of disorder,” “an almost medi­ eval city” (10, 15, 32) with open sewers and street battles between National Guard and urban guerrillas. These events are presented both as (parodically) apocalyptic and also 460...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 407–430.
Published: 01 September 2001
... face off in the din­ ing hall; the perfect proportion of a Vermeer painting resides in the high­ speed elevator; the castle itself is Gothic “with a Gothicity raised to a higher power, more medieval than any building of the thirteenth centu­ ry” (Swan 13). Pordage analyzes Stoyte as someone who...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 247–270.
Published: 01 September 2016
..., the big-house novel ( Moynahan 1995 , 224). In Watt , Mr Knott’s big house appears appropriately gothic to the eyes of its future servant; his first sighting of the house fills Watt with “confidence and with awe also, for the chimneys of Mr Knott’s house were visible at last, in the light, of the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 567–574.
Published: 01 December 2010
...). Both novels demonstrate the complexity of Adler’s theories and Bottome’s narrative experiments with interiority. In these novels, as Hirsch notes, elements of the Gothic “underline the fact that sanity and insanity are not polar opposites, but—frequently—the product of circum- stances” (188...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 343–350.
Published: 01 June 2013
... were made for it”—could have been basis for a Jamesian story of semi-gothic perfidy, but Edel’s more general ambition—to “take all HJ as my province and tell all comers that I am doing Everything!” (187)—bespeaks a truly Jamesian scoundrel. Anesko tells the whole fascinating story. Bad enough...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 681–689.
Published: 01 December 2013
...- collar white male New Englander who has deliberately chosen not to migrate away from his gothic native milieu, as an invitation for deeper reflection on regional decay and the creative reinvention of older literary forms. Arthur describes Banks as productively anti-urban, focused most directly on...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 228–236.
Published: 01 June 2017
... neither Latin nor English. But another reading is possible, that the word is a mistake for pteropus , the genus name for a very large bat. The mention of twilight reinforces that possibility, which might take us in a jocoserious way to the vampire and Nightwood ’s place in a Gothic tradition. The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 42–60.
Published: 01 March 2006
... fied Moore’s work as “satirical realism,” to be contrasted with the “gothic fabulist” work of Boyle (117). This contrast is helpful, and one need only think of Donald Barthelme or David Foster Wallace to recognize that Boyle is in fact representative of a powerful strain of American fiction...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 166–192.
Published: 01 June 2008
... representation of Gothic architecture, has shown how Hill acknowledges “that artistic values are implicated in societal patterns of violence and exploitation” (196) and that Hill’s “con­ cern with the social ethics of English architecture mirrors his concern with the personal ethics of poetic workmanship...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 99–110.
Published: 01 March 2014
... “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?” territory. To take one particularly gothic, and telling, example: when the neighbor-cat on which Moore based her poem “Peter” moved away with his owners, leaving the poet bereft, another sympathetic neighbor gave her a stray kitten. But for Mary, even this creature...