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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 392–410.
Published: 01 September 2015
...Laci Mattison This essay reads Elizabeth Bowen’s The Little Girls (1963) alongside recent theorists of “thingness,” namely, Bill Brown and Jane Bennett. While Bowen’s things intersect with the social terrain, they also simultaneously and paradoxically destabilize that very reality. This...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): vii–xi.
Published: 01 June 2011
... makes you think I hate you?” “Because we’re girls,” wailed the boys. John Wayne held his sons and stroked their hair. “Oh, there, there, you’re not girls, you’re not girls,” said the father. “What makes you think you’re girls?” “Because we’re putting on lipstick,” said...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 663–687.
Published: 01 December 2012
... March complains, “and why . . . weren’t [there] things like this in novels—oh, yes, there were dreadful things enough in novels, but they happened only to poor girls—ignorant and reckless girls” (211). By 1933, Bookman reviewer Dorthea Brande would marvel, “at the rate [abortion] is occurring as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 504–512.
Published: 01 September 2013
... its origins already an interracial form. Only later, with the institutionalization of the blues and efforts of archivists such as Alan Lomax did blues music acquire a reputa- tion for being “authentic” or “inauthentic.” Graham’s final chapter, “‘Got Over’: The Chorus Girl Novel and the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 193–213.
Published: 01 June 2000
.... Certain characters never will be domesticated: Otto and Jake, for example. They are continually outside of the domestic, with no wives or children of their own, temporary inhabitants of other people’s houses. Wick Cutter, through his seduction and rape of his hired girls, is a threat to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 March 2006
... desire to serve justice but does not acknowledge the desire to expunge his own guilt. In imagining that he can read the fragmentary evidence of Empires victims and in attempting to read the mark of Em­ pire on the body of the barbarian girl he prostitutes, he confuses penance with reparation...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 378–392.
Published: 01 September 2009
..., especially Ulysses. A scholarly study published in 1897, The Authoress argues that the Homeric Odyssey was actually written by a Sicilian girl who portrayed herself in the figure of Nausicaa. The book met with critical reservations on its appearance but soon achieved a certain notoriety among...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 209–231.
Published: 01 June 2015
... start to ask for the girl, the greedy woman tries desperately to find her. Unable to recover Ninette on her own, the madam turns to the brothel cook, a Creole woman who describes a spell that will bring the girl back and crush her rebellious spirit like “dirt under your feet.” The madam and the cook...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 123–130.
Published: 01 March 2003
... into glamour- girl pinups and dreams of catching a glimpse of their ilk in New York. The interesting thing for our purposes is that only pictures of girls with French names seem to unleash the full panoply of fantasy and desire. One of the pinups named Gretchen, for example, clearly doesn’t...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 148–179.
Published: 01 June 2011
...; David is a writer distracted by his wife’s exploration of masculinity, racialized fantasy, and lesbianism.2 Early in the narrative, Catherine surprises her husband with a haircut “cropped as short as a boy’s” (14) explaining “I’m a girl, But now I’m a boy too” (15). That night she goes...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 104–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
... scholars include her in the canon of Southern literature.6 Yet, while she has certainly invoked Southern genealogies again and again in her novels, Morrison is not Southern, nor are the girl protagonists of The Bluest Eye. 107 Lisa A. Long To an extent, it is the specific tension between...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 513–518.
Published: 01 December 2017
... ending “makes the reader reconstruct everything that has come before” as we realize that the novel has not been about male desire at all but about the mutual love of little girls. The central premise of the chapter on A Mercy (2008) is that this novel returns to the central theme of Beloved —the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2004) 50 (1): 88–105.
Published: 01 March 2004
... hint at the uncertainties and brutalities of love and ask how and why “women and girls have been cast as the custodians of everyday existence” (Smith and Gerstler 1), they obliquely suggest the nervous anxiety of our relations with language as well. Like other postmodern texts...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 141–166.
Published: 01 June 2004
..., disingenuously, from Sussex: I forgot to tell you, there is a Gypsy caravan not far from here and a blue spiral of smoke curls insidiously around the haggard pines .Also there was a tall girl, with glittering brass earrings, great tawny braids of hair, and a face brown as a berry. She...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 264–271.
Published: 01 June 2011
... supplied by the government or companies (Proctor and Gamble, Campbell’s Soup) with some patriotic foodstuff to sell; songs and films; advertisements; series novels aimed at teenage girls and adult magazine fiction; pamphlets pro- moting classroom wartime activities; and accounts of England’s White...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 485–509.
Published: 01 December 2009
... Moreau appeared in April 1896, and Shaw envisioned the encounter between his flower girl and professor of phonetics as early as September 1897.3 In both novella and play, self-centered experiment- ers try to make people from “animals,” mainly to see if they can do it. These transformations cause...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 298–327.
Published: 01 September 2003
... heard here, with similar nuances of ex­ pression: “I know my poor mother, God rest her soul, used to say: ‘My son,’ she said, ‘if you come to me and say you want to marry a good Jewish girl, I don’t care whether she hasn’t a chemise to her back, I’ll welcome her—but if...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 60–89.
Published: 01 March 2012
...Gary Totten Copyright © Hofstra University 2012 Gary Totten “Inhospitable Splendour”: Spectacles of Consumer Culture and Race in Wharton’s Summer Gary Totten In her posthumously published essay “A Little Girl’s New York” (1937), Edith Wharton refers to her mother, Lucretia...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 391–412.
Published: 01 December 2006
... falsification” (11): The last doll, given to age, is the girl who should have been a boy, and the boy who should have been a girl! .. .The doll and the immature have something right about them, the doll because it resembles but does not contain life, and the third sex because...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 327–344.
Published: 01 September 2007
... prose, he is entirely conversant w ith its conventions and practices.) His major novel, Infinite Jest, over 1,000 pages long, appeared in 1996, and he has also published several collections o f short stories: Girl with Curious Hair (1989), Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), and...