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gandhi

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 511–518.
Published: 01 December 2015
... the metacritical question of how these texts can be understood in light of theoretical debates in postcolonial studies, subaltern studies, Marxist historiography, nationalist historiography, Gandhi studies, and Indian English literary studies. Shingavi deftly interweaves these different levels of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 510–544.
Published: 01 December 2001
... with the independence movement. As Juraga notes, there is an “almost complete lack of coverage of the Gandhi-led Nationalist move­ ment” (180). (In fact, Gandhi is far more of a presence in the novel than is commonly recognized. We shall return to this point later.) Nor does he begin in, say...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 245–253.
Published: 01 June 2010
... modernity as one that reveals the decline of modern Indian theater as well as the futility of looking backward nostalgically. Sawhney’s third chapter, “Allegory and Violence: Gandhi’s Reading of the Bhagavad Git centers not so much on a primary text as on a primary reader. It revisits important...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
... Mahatma Gandhi from Midnight’s Children.8 Rather than de­ picting the epic tale of resistance initiated by Mahatma Gandhi, the novel returns repeatedly to the sectarianism and tyranny instituted by Indira Gandhi. I will argue, however, that Rushdie rejects the heroic myth as the basis...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2001
... proposes “new routes, that do not altogether abandon the terrain of political history, but recount it in different terms” (3). Khilnani’s route begins with the vastly different but ultimately col- laboratory visions ofjawaharlal Nehru and Mohandas Gandhi for an in- Twentieth-Century...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 572–596.
Published: 01 December 2009
... way as anything evoked by Buchenwald or Hiroshima: It was the day of Gandhi’s assassination; but on Calvary the sightseers were more interested in the contents of their picnic baskets than in the possible significance of the, after all, rather commonplace event they...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 339–361.
Published: 01 September 2008
... in the windows protected against bricks by metal grilles. (286) Writing about an advertising campaign for Macintosh computers that features a photograph of Mahatma Gandhi and the caption “Think different,” Rushdie echoes Jameson’s critique of postmodernism as the cultural...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 311–327.
Published: 01 September 2000
... set up or framed by a Huxley-like narra­ tor who recounts the discovery of a film script by an unknown, rejected writer, William Tallis. The setting for this discovery is a studio lot on 30 Janu­ ary 1948—“the day of Gandhi’s assassination.” Two Hollywood writers walk through the studio lot, one...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
... letter to Rajiv Gandhi, Rushdie insists that “the book isn’t about Islam, but about mi­ gration, metamorphoses, divided selves, love, death, London and Bom­ bay. . . . How much further from history could one get?” (Appignanesi 35-36). Later, however, in the Observer, he claims that the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 355–364.
Published: 01 June 2012
...) charge, constantly doubling back on itself. Trousdale ultimately argues, however, that Rushdie’s cosmopolitanism fails in the Bombay novels because the individual can never supersede the group. For example, Saleem’s suppression of Gandhi throughout Midnight’s Children signals an aversion to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
... ment for national independence, they did so in a way that was ac­ ceptable to, and was dictated by, the male leaders and which con­ formed to the prevalent ideology on the position of women. (107) Ketu Katrak further argues that, although Gandhi mobilized women in the nationalist struggle...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 462–492.
Published: 01 December 2010
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 444–466.
Published: 01 December 2001
...] novelistic skill is applied to the political shenanigans of an Indira Gandhi, a Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, or a Zia-ul-Haq,” he argues, “Rushdie’s novels achieve the status of responsible and context-specific political satire mediated through magic realism” (327). It is only in Haroun that Rushdie...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 423–444.
Published: 01 December 2009
... as criteria of distinction. This philosophical struggle then serves to clarify the ethical stakes in Aldous Huxley’s post-Holocaust novel, which—from its opening invocation of Gandhi’s murder to its presentation of a screenplay describing a fantasy of warring mutant eugenicist primates...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 513–537.
Published: 01 December 2014
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 283–316.
Published: 01 September 2004
... lenge. He was aware of the stars in their courses, the earth turn­ ing, time passing, Gandhi spinning, Lenin dying by inches at his desk, Proust (whom he didn’t like) writing, the bus-driver’s wife cooking supper, China starving, America drunk on bathtub gin, the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 129–160.
Published: 01 June 2018