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freud

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2010
...Murray McArthur Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Symptom and Sign: Janet, Freud, Eliot, and the Literary Mandate of Laughter Symptom and Sign: Janet, Freud, Eliot, and the Literary Mandate of Laughter Murray McArthur In 1906, T. S. Eliot’s freshman year at Harvard, Pierre...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 196–220.
Published: 01 June 2010
...Steve Vine Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Steve Vine Sublime Anamnesis: Hysteria and Temporality in Thomas’s The White Hotel Steve Vine Hysterics suffer mainly from reminiscences. —Sigmund Freud (Breuer and Freud 58) In his...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 273–304.
Published: 01 September 2014
...Colin Gillis Copyright © Hofstra University 2014 Lawrence’s Bildungsroman and the Science of Sexual Development Lawrence’s Bildungsroman and the Science of Sexual Development Colin Gillis In the 1922 postscript to Sigmund Freud’s “Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-Year-Old Boy...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2001
... race, Beloved challenges both Freudian and French feminist theories of hysteria in significant ways. Twentieth-Century Literature 47.1 • Spring 2001 • 1 Emma Parker In Studies on Hysteria, Freud and Breuer first challenged prevailing nineteenth-century views of hysteria...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 88–91.
Published: 01 March 2007
... object of scientific scrutiny and a matter of increasing social exigency. In this chapter Weinbaum juxtaposes Darwin’s Sexual Selection with Freud’s essay “The Aetiology of Hysteria” to demonstrate how “racialization is intimately bound up with women’s sexual agency and wayward desire...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 175–198.
Published: 01 June 2006
... a cultural repression/sublimation of the id, is a form of the same primal sadism as the id. The id/violence can be the radical core of the superego/ culture, an ominous example of Freud’s paradox of the uncanny: what seems the most alien can be the most familiar, and vice versa. In short, the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 391–412.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., its excesses of articulation contorting the cause-and-effect linearity of chronological history—the straight face of narrative realism—with unac­ countable laughter. The uncanny is Freud’s name for the irruption of the unconscious into social reality. Mladen Dolar asserts...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 421–432.
Published: 01 December 2004
... Freud conceptualized them are being adumbrated. An emphasis on self-awareness presumes that uncon­ scious grids can, perhaps, be brought to consciousness and subsequently incorporated into self-consciousness; however, given the economic and functional dimensions of the unconscious system—its role...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010
... was directly responsible (“Old Bloomsbury” 196). Bloomsbury’s ideas about sexuality were heavily influenced by sexual scientists from Weininger to Freud, and both bisexuality and androgyny were key points of debate in these discussions. Though its important role in the epistemological...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 25–46.
Published: 01 March 2010
... melancholia” (18).1 A number of critics have questioned the strict division between healthy mourning and pathological melancholia so influentially established by Freud. Might Freud’s model of mourning, this approach asks, seem to endorse the abdication of responsibility for the past? Taking up the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 360–368.
Published: 01 June 2013
... individual writers. G. E. Moore, Sigmund Freud, E. M. Forster, D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, and Vita Sackville-West each emerges in Wolfe’s text as possessing a unique understanding of intimacy that would have been unpalatable for the others, but which Wolfe gathers together under the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2012
... sexual and aggressive drives (7). 189 Vicki Tromanhauser In Freud’s essay entitled “One of the Difficulties of Psycho-Analysis” (1917), published by the Hogarth Press the same year as Mrs. Dalloway in the fourth volume of the Collected Papers,3 Freud characterizes the history of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 336–366.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Narcissus story in culture. Myth and worship In his 1914 essay “On Narcissism: An Introduction,” Freud postulates that while all infants pass through a phase of primary narcissism, women tend to develop an “intensification of the original narcissism,” a phenomenon “unfavorable to the development...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 547–571.
Published: 01 December 2009
... much as a figure in itself as a car- rier of Darwin’s idea of artificial selection. My larger argument is that Moore and Bishop, modern queer women poets, would have found Dar- win’s theories far more amenable to their sense of sexual and aesthetic deviation than those offered by Freud, who...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 333–340.
Published: 01 June 2012
... one of Freud’s most classic cases, Sergei Pankejeff, otherwise known as the Wolf Man. In discussing Freud, Seitler suggests that residual animality “enacts” the condition of atavism as a “return not to but of the past” (33). The Wolf Man case functions as an introduction to the image of being...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 262–268.
Published: 01 June 2009
... the modern novel, as prominent novelists increasingly incorporated Freud’s theories of repression and fantasy into their narratives, especially in their attempts to capture the degree to which sexual urges and anxieties informed the interior consciousness of their characters and saturated those...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 391–413.
Published: 01 December 2005
... and his silent response to Yeats in particular may also owe something to Joyce’s writing at a time when Freud and others had proposed that silence is literally expressive, usually in a negative sense. Several of Freud’s pre-1922 writings explore the significance of silence in contexts...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 347–351.
Published: 01 September 2006
... masochism, including Freud and Deleuze (Reik gets strangely little play here), and literary theorists of masochism such as Kaja Silverman and Carol Siegel. Fantina divides theorists into two camps, progressive and reactionary, which points out the way sexual behavior is inevitably...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 341–348.
Published: 01 June 2012
... sentimental, ‘simpering,’ and (thus) insufficiently manly” (64). Forter begins his chapter on Faulkner, “Versions of Traumatic Melan- cholia: The Burden of White Man’s History in Light in August and Absalom, Absalom by reworking the dominant understanding of Freud’s theory of trauma. He...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 371–393.
Published: 01 September 2007
... cal trauma. In light o f this notion, the opposed narrative o f the American past and present can be thought of, following Berger’s formulation, as the traumatic.8 Freud borrowed trauma, the Greek word for wound, to name the phenom enon o f a shocking event that proves...