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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 50–76.
Published: 01 March 2002
...Richard P. Lynch Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 m Freedoms in The French Lieutenant’s Woman R ichard P. Lynch J o h n Fowles has always been concerned with the general issue of hu­ man freedom, by which he usually means the freedom of individuals from the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 123–130.
Published: 01 March 2003
...Michael Hollington Copyright © Hofstra University 2003 Ml Fitzgerald s French Michael Hollington For John Callahan ^Everyone knows that F. Scott Fitzgerald came from St. Paul, Minne­ sota, but fewer are aware that the city was originally French...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 79–100.
Published: 01 March 2018
..., and addresses it directly in her French Ways and Their Meaning . Part of the agenda of that slim primer was to illustrate, on the basis of the French example, that (if properly handled) curiosity and reverence are not antagonistic but mutually animating cultural values. Achieving this ideal state...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 289–308.
Published: 01 September 2016
...Yael Levin This paper traces instances of metalepsis in John Fowles’s The French Lieutenant’s Woman , Vladimir Nabokov’s Bend Sinister , Karin Fossum’s Broken , and J. M. Coetzee’s Slow Man . In its collapsing of narrative levels, that stylistic device is commonly seen as dramatizing a uniquely...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 475–498.
Published: 01 December 2017
...David Herd In August 1943, Marianne Moore delivered a lecture at the then displaced annual international symposium Entretiens de Pontigny. Hosted at Mount Holyoke College and convened by the exiled French philosopher Jean Wahl, “Pontigny-en-Amérique” was a highly charged occasion at which the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 429–447.
Published: 01 December 2016
... fiction British fiction French fiction Regeneration trilogy torture witness Pat Barker’s novel of 1991, Regeneration , and Assia Djebar’s novel of 1962, Les Enfants du nouveau monde —translated as Children of the New World under the aegis of the City University of New York’s Feminist Press...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 12–31.
Published: 01 March 2003
..., modernism, a context appreciative of the writer’s craft and the arts in general. They sought what they could not find in America: a non- America and often an anti-America. Their subject could be American failings, observations on France and the French, cultural clashes, Ameri­ can identity, writing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 2003
... tourists with their oohing and umbrage, politicians play these opposing responses out in a Manichean shadow theater of televised embraces and mean asides. The reality of the French-American relationship is far more complex than this binary formulation, however, if only because both par­ ties bring...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 240–245.
Published: 01 June 2016
... a French Catholic novel by the eminent right-wing polemicist and sometime celebrant of radical anti-Semitism, Georges Bernanos. The novel, published in 1926, is Sous le soleil de Satan (whose second section is titled “La Tentation du désespoir”), and it periodically resurfaces in Sollors’s book as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 32–45.
Published: 01 March 2003
... life as an amusing ideological spectacle” (Chadbourne 104), a high regard for French criticism,2 and an esteem for France as the epitome of civilization and culture, able to weather any series of di­ sasters. Wharton is on record for praising not only Renan but also Sainte- Beuve,Anatole France...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 528–534.
Published: 01 December 2015
... the same time. Chapter 1, “The Globalization of the Novel and the Novelization of the Global,” uses works by the famous French writer Jules Verne and the less well-known Argentine novelist Eduardo Holmberg to explore two modes of understanding world literature. In one mode, we can approach works...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 368–393.
Published: 01 December 2004
... to an as­ sertion of the imperialist doctrine Maga now supported. More exactly, the doctrine acknowledged that imperialism was so difficult and danger­ ous that only the British were fit to undertake it. The French and other Continentals would always make a mess of things. North’s motto...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 357–377.
Published: 01 September 2009
..., required if not defined by bureau stop orders at US ports of entry” (45).3 British and French officials, moreover, advised McKay that his presence was unwanted in either country or their protected lands (51). During the period of Banjo’s composition, then, McKay was trying to secure his rights to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 499–506.
Published: 01 December 2017
... centers his study on “the basic biographical fact” of Kerouac’s French Canadian upbringing (1). As Melehy summarizes: “At birth he was given the name Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac, at the time his native Lowell, Massachusetts was about 25 percent French-speaking, and by his own account he didn’t speak...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 495–503.
Published: 01 December 2005
... readers visualize such a face-to-face encounter, she begins her introduction with a close reading of two portraits by the contemporary French portrait painter Jacques-Émile Blanche, one of Colette and one of Woolf. Blanche’s representation of Colette reclining on a chaise longue in flowing dress...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 209–231.
Published: 01 June 2015
... language authors, particularly American authors, toward more experimental literary efforts like those thriving in German and French but only beginning in English with writers like Joyce and Stein. At the same time, Jolas and Paul warn against unchecked or superficial experimentation. By the third issue...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 82–102.
Published: 01 March 2003
... troduction to the work of the French novelist Estelle Monbrun, whose own recent examples of the Franco-American polar (detective novel) traverse national and aesthetic boundaries, Pierre Verdaguer stresses the thematic and stylistic flexibility of the form: “It allows every kind of mix­ ture and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2004) 50 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 March 2004
..., England” (44). Noting that Jacques Laruelle (the failed filmmaker) is a French national, that Geoffrey Firmin (the dissolute con­ sul) and his half-brother Hugh (the radical journalist) are British nation­ als, and that Firmin’s divorced wife Yvonne (the Hollywood actress) is an American national...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 328–359.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Paris France she continues a literary tradition of emphasizing the “ma­ terial,” or materiality of daily life, describing French food, fashion, and culture. Despite the “phony war” between France and Germany (from September 1939 to May 1940), during which Paris France was written, Stein...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 619–656.
Published: 01 December 2013
... constructed course of study, and one that mirrors closely the curriculum of another esteemed institution, Milton Academy. For example, the plays by Shakespeare, the essays by Burke and Macaulay, the histories of and translations from Latin, Greek, and French that Eliot accomplished in his sixth year...