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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2002) 48 (3): 348–361.
Published: 01 September 2002
...Craig Smith m Across the Widest Gulf: Nonhuman Subjectivity in Virginia Woolf’s Flush Craig Smith I n 1933 Virginia W oolf published Flush: A Biography, an experim ent in genre that purports to tell the life story o f Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s canine companion...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2015) 61 (3): 287–304.
Published: 01 September 2015
... by Wills David . New York : Fordham University Press . Derrida Jacques . 2009 . The Beast and the Sovereign , vol. 1 . Translated by Bennington Geoffrey . Chicago : University of Chicago Press . Dubino Jeanne . 2014 . “ The Bispecies Environment, Coevolution and Flush...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2012) 58 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2012
... speaking a guarantor of one’s humanity. In Flush (1933), the fictional biography of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s cocker spaniel, Flush returns to London from Italy, following Septimus’s trajectory from the Italian front after the war, and learns “that Mrs Carlyle’s dog Nero had leapt from a top...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (1): 20–33.
Published: 01 March 2000
... ing and paling to palest rose, leaf by leaf and wave of light by wave of light, flooding all the heavens with its soft flushes, every flush deeper than the other. (172) Stephen’s swoon has often been taken up by critics within what Carol Shloss refers to as the “second stage...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
..., Culture, Nation: Edith Wharton and Ernest Renan” 49.1 (2003): 32-45 Smith, Craig. “Across the Widest Gulf: Nonhuman Subjectivity in Virginia Woolf’s Flush. ” 48.3 (2002): 348-361 Smith, Stevie. See Najarian Spender, Stephen. See Brown Stanfield, Paul Scott. “‘This Implacable Doctrine...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2014) 60 (3): 305–335.
Published: 01 September 2014
...: “The unexpected interest made him flush.” Occurring 323 Julie Taylor both underneath and on the surface of the skin, a flush is, crucially, a scene of intimate communication between the two subjects.19 The flush makes the injured man readable to the factory owner’s son, and what it makes readable...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2020) 66 (2): 265–272.
Published: 01 June 2020
... where empiricism cannot legitimately go—into the Umwelt of animals. Thus Woolf’s animal-focalized fiction, including “Kew Gardens” and Flush , negotiates “the challenges and possibilities that arise when the empiricist self aims to move beyond direct experience and apprehend the revelatory...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2008) 54 (3): 273–306.
Published: 01 September 2008
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2017) 63 (2): 191–212.
Published: 01 June 2017
..., and nervous stock drummers of the twenties. These glittering depictions of the modernist heyday frame failure as a blip in the erratic fantasy of bohemian life. Flexible labor can be fun, one imagines, watching an attractively cast Hemingway storming through cafés drunk on the occasional flush of strong...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2014) 60 (1): 99–110.
Published: 01 March 2014
... confronts the vexed question of the poet’s sexuality. Note the impassioned Handel. She [Moore] refuses to equate celibacy with sexlessness. Henry James provides her best demon- stration that bachelorhood need not preclude passion: “Things for Henry James glow, flush, glimmer...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (1): 39–71.
Published: 01 March 2001
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2020) 66 (2): 233–264.
Published: 01 June 2020
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2007) 53 (4): 442–458.
Published: 01 December 2007
... all. Believes his own lies. Does really. Wonderful liar. But want a good memory” (351). Here Bloom suspects the integrity of such gossip about music. Yet when Simon Dedalus sings, everyone— Bloom included—falls into private reverie. People become flushed with emotion (“Braintipped, cheek...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (3): 328–345.
Published: 01 September 2000
... be re­ paired, replaced, or rescued” (“Participial Acts” 66). The interruption of accumulation, unlike work, is not any simple cessation; it is not a periodic moment of leisure, a holiday, a flushed sense of achievement and pride. Accumulation is mute and unnoticed—and its “failure” is nearly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2005) 51 (1): 25–42.
Published: 01 March 2005
...,” Neil reports, “not without flushing once or twice, to get the book back in the stacks.” Neil’s behavior becomes comprehensible when he is seen to be trying to replace a lost object—or, in Lacanian terms, to fill a lack in his being— that he experiences in his relationship with Brenda. From...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2007) 53 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2007
... a Calvinist sermon against excess. On the contrary, it mimes the very beauty that it chastens; it is certainly “dreamlike” when 5 Derek Furr a baby rabbit transforms into “a handful of tangible ash / with fixed, ig­ nited eyes” (104), and it is “too pretty” when “the paper chambers flush...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2021) 67 (3): 269–292.
Published: 01 September 2021
... with which the typist responds to this other uninvited sexual encounter: The time is now propitious, as he guesses, The meal is ended, she is bored and tired, Endeavours to engage her in caresses Which still are unreproved, if undesired. Flushed and decided, he assaults at once; Exploring hands...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (1): 56–77.
Published: 01 March 2000
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2008) 54 (2): 193–216.
Published: 01 June 2008
... and the Schlegels’ freedom is then cruelly underscored when, having followed Margaret back to Wickham Place, Leonard finds that the sisters are so flush with umbrellas that Helen has no idea which one of them does not belong there. Leonard plods on through the story, faced at every turn...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2012) 58 (1): 117–140.
Published: 01 March 2012
... and Grave Digger’s regular meetings with higher-ranked white policemen, when they present their rationales for their actions and get, for the most part, only grudging approval; their routine encounters with madames to flush out criminals hiding out with prostitutes; their regular slapping around...