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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 192–206.
Published: 01 June 2004
... unique. One acquires the right to use a particular domain name by registering that name with an autho­ rized administrator of the central database of names, such as Network Solutions, Inc., and paying the initial registration fee and subsequent renewal fees, which are typically...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 663–687.
Published: 01 December 2012
... haggling to lower the cost of their abortion: Helen N. got the $65 fee lowered to $50 by explaining that she had only paid $50 for her last abortion; Charlotte B. refused the $65 by complaining that a “lady friend” had only paid $50; Paula F. got her $35 counter-offer accepted by first pretending...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 475–498.
Published: 01 December 2017
...—after a word-waterfall of the banal— as unattainable as freedom. And what is freedom for? For “self-discipline,” as our hardest-working citizen has said—a school: it is for “freedom to toil” with a fee for the tool. (190–91) To quote at length is to register a series of interruptions. In the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2005) 51 (3): 285–315.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 1–35.
Published: 01 March 2009
... elections” (200), and shordy thereafter it dies.When the credulous Indarsingh looks to the PPU after the election to make good on its promise to cover his deposit (an official entry fee required of all candidates), he finds that the party has “just disappeared” (204). Similarly, the United Front...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 484–510.
Published: 01 December 2015
... school at cost.” “Which set of books do I get to see, Dan?” “It’s not every father has such a grand head for business. You could get blood out of a stone . . .” “And let’s say you throw your fee from Chet into the Building Fund . . .” Which was how [the school] Saint Eugene’s got built at Rancho Rio...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 224–254.
Published: 01 June 2011
... by nationalists as an authentic image of Irish culture. In Ulysses Irish tourism is as much an extension of capitalist innova- tion as colonial rule, an element of the bourgeoning of the leisure indus- try at the beginning of the twentieth century. Although Bloom’s imagined fee for the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 283–308.
Published: 01 June 2013
... instead deeply skeptical of literary tourism and the apparent assumptions of house museums. She suggests setting “an examination . . . in place of entrance fee” at the Carlyle Museum—but concludes that “the house would soon have to be shut up” (“Haworth” 5). This unease is tempered by curiosity...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 462–492.
Published: 01 December 2010
... that can be sold or used to produce commodities (“cocoa,” “cof- fee,” “tonka bean,” “mango,” “orange,” “avocado pear,” “nutmeg,” “cedar,” “poui,” “bois-canot,” “cricket bat Like Mr. Biswas himself, this portrayal of the estate seems constrained by the need to be captivating to an audience with...