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faulkner

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 June 2017
...Greg Chase Where Addie Bundren’s bitter statement in Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying that “words are no good” has often been read as concerning the universal shortcomings of language, this article turns to the philosophy of Faulkner’s contemporary Ludwig Wittgenstein for a more context-specific...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 681–689.
Published: 01 December 2013
... right, which might have advanced Smith’s argument in more sophisticated ways, thus remains largely untapped. Similar sorts of missed opportunities mark Chapter 4, the bulk of which consists of a fine and nuanced reading of an episode from William Faulkner’s The Mansion (1959). Here Smith...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 360–365.
Published: 01 September 2006
... Faulkner and Tennessee Williams), the tradi­ tional (Robert Penn Warren and the Agrarians), and the unlikely (Monroe K. Spears, Walter Sullivan, and William Humphrey).Winchell is patently uninterested in the mainstream language of constructions, liminal spaces, and ambiguities that drives so...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 514–525.
Published: 01 December 2008
... pages. William Faulkner: An Economy of Complex Words , by Godden Richard , Princeton : Princeton University Press , 2007 . 251 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 Ml Reviews A Commitment to the Meaningful From Guilt to Shame: Auschwitz and After by Ruth Leys Princeton...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 125–129.
Published: 01 March 2009
... as well as to construct a protective space isolated from capitalist bourgeois values and practices. In chapter 5, Duck places William Faulkners use of the gothic in the context of both cosmopolitan modernism and Faulkners participation in “modernity’s temporal multiplicity” (147). Like Joyce...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 414–422.
Published: 01 September 2014
... theory, Widiss’s study challenges conventional understandings of twentieth- century literary history. Drawing on a wide range of texts—two novels (William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying and Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita), two memoirs (Gertrude Stein’s The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas and Dave...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 663–687.
Published: 01 December 2012
...: Theodore Dreiser, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Sinclair Lewis, Claude McKay, Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton, William Carlos Williams, Floyd Dell, John Dos Passos, Josephine Herbst, Meridel Le Sueur, Ruth McKenney, Tess Slesinger, Agnes...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 307–338.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Faulkner— a strand that combines radical formal innovation, allegiance to a past that 309 Thomas F. Haddox is both idealized and perceived as an impossible burden, and an impera­ tive to reflect the temporal dislocations and uneven social and economic developments o f modernity. To the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 269–276.
Published: 01 June 2010
... genre fiction or pulp fiction, they aspire to more than escapism. They may be found on the shelves of some public libraries (those that have not yet purged their collections for computer space), where next to high-canonical works by William Faulkner and spy thrillers by Ken Follett sit...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 341–348.
Published: 01 June 2012
... other. He illustrates these points through readings of four canonical authors, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Cather. These convincing readings employ biographical, historical, and textual analysis to reveal each text as a failed attempt to recall a lost fluidity in gender—a failure that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 174–180.
Published: 01 March 2013
... postmodern Faulkner takeoff,Getting Mother’s Body (2003). The book expands on a 2008 special issue of African American Review and a 2010 co-edited critical collection titled Representing Segregation: Toward an Aesthetics of Living Jim Crow, and Other Forms of Racial Division, and as such represents...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 359–364.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Warrior. The second chapter, in my estimation the book’s most compelling, uses the polysemous phrase “burial plot” to organize a discussion of narrative punctuality and delay in Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying and the “Hades” episode of Joyce’s Ulysses . Sherman reads the “I” of Faulkner’s title as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 331–335.
Published: 01 September 2004
... ethnic writing. His five case studies—the careers o f William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Ernest Gaines, Rolando Hinojosa, and Leslie Marmon Silko— are chosen to illustrate the evolu­ tion of authenticity as a category of judgment from the regional to the ethnic, with Richard Wright...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 401–408.
Published: 01 September 2009
... like a strange European invention,” why “modern music and jazz had subcultural or popular, not national or artistic significance,” why “the best modernist literature” often lacked readers (6)—and why, with surprising rapidity (as late as 1945, most of Faulkner’s seventeen books were out of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 122–129.
Published: 01 March 2010
... its gates, rendering authors like F. Scott Fitzgerald and William Faulkner shadows of their former selves. Edmund Wilson’s 1941 study of novelists living in California, The Boys in the Back Room, begins with a mock epic poem in which a ghostly figure appears: “What shining phantom folds its...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 515–523.
Published: 01 September 2012
... Brian McHale’s discussion of the “epistemological dominant” of modern- ist fiction (how and why does one narrator in a Faulkner novel know the world differently than others; which if any can we trust Does Faulkner not force readers into “hypothetical” intellection? I think also of Linda...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 275–294.
Published: 01 September 2018
... answer these questions, has unthinkingly fallen back on the overquoted Faulknerian dictum, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past” ( Faulkner 1951 , 92). In the context of novels about slavery and its legacy, this amounts to conceptualizing the slave past as “not simply an object of experience or...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 535–539.
Published: 01 December 2007
... Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2006.172 pages Mark Osteen The title of this compact and generally helpful study comes, by way of Jean-Luc Godard’s film Breathless, from William Faulkner’s Wild Palms, where Harry Wilbourne is given a choice between “grief and nothing” and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 629–633.
Published: 01 December 2009
... though they are—but we do not identify with them. Our experience of them is irreducibly vicarious. In the course of his argument Flesch deploys a satisfying range of examples from Dickens, Trollope, Nabokov, Shakespeare, Leiris, James, Hitchcock, Faulkner, Homer, and others, culminating...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 2003
... narrow provincial life in her sleepy Berry. Richard Wright came to Paris not because it resembled America but because it did not (though, escaping Jim Crow, he would reluctantly recognize his native land in French racism during the Algerian War). Faulkner’s France was a spiritual terre...