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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 128–136.
Published: 01 March 2014
...Ali Chetwynd Fictions of Fact and Value: The Erasure of Logical Positivism in American Literature 1945–1975 , by LeMahieu Michael , Oxford University Press , 2013 . 244 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2014 Ali Chetwynd Fictions of Fact and Value:  The Erasure of Logical...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 317–346.
Published: 01 September 2018
... inadvertently drawn into wartime intrigues, forcing her to turn vigilante in an effort to expose abuses of power at the highest levels of government. Although farfetched, these pulp fictions may, in fact, contain a kernel of truth. Following (the real) Woolf’s theory that “bad books are not the mirrors but the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 287–317.
Published: 01 September 2010
...- tieth century. In the detective novel the hero is dead at the very beginning, so you don’t have to deal with human nature at all, only the slow accumulation of facts. —Laurie Anderson the underpart is, though stemmed, uncertain is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 100–114.
Published: 01 March 2000
... accounts. Every time human experience is rendered as fact, however, the human place in war becomes more abstracted and more simplistic. In “We’re Adjusted Too Well,” Tim O’Brien voiced his dismay that the nation’s hope for everything to slide back into some vague state of being “normal”—or...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 419–447.
Published: 01 December 2008
... Review critic Schwartz yet gratify the existentialist Sartre. Like many fellow-traveling reviewers of U.S.A., Schwartz objected that the novel emphasized the negative “facts” of political oppression without delineating the positive “values” that might help readers envision the goals of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 518–529.
Published: 01 December 2007
... principled self-scrutiny” (4) is to say more than the facts of this very complex case allow. Self-consciousness is not always principled, and it is impossible to imagine Jackson Pollock or Picasso subscribing to an aesthetic or an ethics that relies in any way on principles. In fact, in his...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 484–510.
Published: 01 December 2015
... license—taken by putatively factual text. But this time, the mini-tempest wasn’t about a finished work, exactly, as it had been in the cases of Janet Cooke, Jayson Blair, James Frey, and so many others. This time, at issue was John D’Agata and Jim Fingal’s The Lifespan of a Fact (2012), a book...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 150–158.
Published: 01 March 2012
... Izenberg locates, even though they might veer off in directions both progressive and fascist, dis- close the possibility of “a new humanism.” Izenberg’s poets bear witness to a century of dehumanization against which they “attempt to make the person appear anew as a value-bearing fact” (35).  This...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 355–373.
Published: 01 September 2001
... protagonist of Paradise is, in fact, the community of Ruby, Oklahoma—including the rag-tag band of Convent women who live on its fringes. This essay will focus on the Ruby-centered narratives in Paradise, which focus on the patriarchy and emphasize a rigidly controlled com­ munal...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 106–110.
Published: 01 March 2006
... the precondition of sameness? The question could also be phrased the opposite way, as Hayot does when he writes: Pound was reminding his readers that the value in Li Po lay not in his Chineseness, but in his universality, in the fact that his po­ ems revealed a shared history of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 93–124.
Published: 01 June 2007
...-Darwinist linguist Steven Pinker—for his reckless application of metaphors from the human realm to the animal, for his apparent disdain for literature and the arts—that her reader might fail to notice that she is, in fact, arguing Twentieth-Century Literature 53.2 Summer 2007 93 Jonathan...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2005) 51 (3): 373–377.
Published: 01 September 2005
... field of his character’s action “by the fact of her femaleness”; for Emma, “reading is a substitute for action; it offers a temporary refuge from the dreary, stale confines of a milieu she despises but cannot leave” (27)—a conclusion Felski reaches while acknowledging the diversity of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 240–245.
Published: 01 June 2016
... the immediate post–world war period in Germany—that is, the last five years of the decade—manages to be both vague and lurid. Its strangeness, moreover, is linked to the fact that for all the focus the author brings to the years of the American occupation of Germany, the title itself is borrowed from...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 114–136.
Published: 01 March 2001
... longer does rest with either the author or the text. In fact, the narrator of “Life Story” emphasizes the immense responsibility of the reader when he says: “your own author bless and damn you his life is in your hands.. . . Don’t you think he knows who gives his creatures their...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 433–435.
Published: 01 December 2015
... wide literary-historical and cultural learning, and justifies the relevance of that learning to Bishop and her text; it makes judicious and resourceful use of Bishop’s letters, her discarded drafts, and the facts of her biography to illuminate the text at hand. It does, in other words, exactly what we...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 128–137.
Published: 01 March 2015
... explanation, Goldstone and Underwood convincingly argue, avoids the pitfalls of oversimplifying the history of literary criticism by overemphasizing particular schools or figures. As an example, they show how explanations based on Michel Foucault’s influence seem to be invalidated by the fact that this trend...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 674–680.
Published: 01 December 2013
.... At the same time, we never lose sight of the fact that if we want to have a sense of the thread that holds the different moments of Lispector’s existence together, we must become her readers. The fact that Moser is, as well, one of her translators and a strong voice for the importance of her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 499–506.
Published: 01 December 2017
... century with their intense desire to differentiate themselves from everything that came before in art, literature, film, politics, and lifestyle” (137). The statement is undermined by the fact that the next chapter in the book (Hilary Holladay on Beat criticism) begins by conversely emphasizing the Beats...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 36–57.
Published: 01 March 2009
... also erodes. Right or wrong, any word is subject to processes of erosion and sedimen­ tation, errancy and stability, that enable it to reach a destination or to be destined at all. Erosion, then, far from posing a threat to all grounds, is in fact essential to them. Conceptual erosion does...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 510–546.
Published: 01 December 2009
... telling readers that “There can be no doubt as to its [the race idea’s] efficiency as the vastest and most ingenious invention for human progress” (817). This statement’s sweeping confidence should stand out in an essay otherwise fraught with qualifications, but in fact those qualifications often...