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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 111–144.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Frances Dickey Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 HI Parrot’s Eye: A Portrait by Manet and Two by T. S. Eliot Frances Dickey T. S. Eliot’s little-known sonnet “On a Portrait” (1909) describes a painting by Edouard Manet from 1866, Woman with a Parrot. The sig­ nificance of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 104–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Lisa A. Long Copyright © Hofstra University 2013 Lisa A. Long A New Midwesternism in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye by Lisa A. Long Whether it is a hated sofa, a violent summer storm, or a crack in the sidewalk, the vivid images in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye (1970...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 79–103.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Nicole Rizzuto Copyright © Hofstra University 2013 Ethical Limits and Confession in Conrad’s Under Western Eyes and “Poland Revisited” Ethical Limits and Confession in Conrad’s Under Western Eyes and “Poland Revisited” Nicole Rizzuto Through the framing narrative of an English...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 1–31.
Published: 01 March 2016
... poorly understood in the academy. Turning a historicist eye toward the novel’s portrayal of the sixties, we see that it dramatizes actual debates among the New Left between anarchist figures, such as Paul Goodman and Murray Bookchin, and emergent neo-Leninist factions such as the Weather Underground and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 244–248.
Published: 01 June 2005
... previous chapter, we must see through a poet’s eyes and language; our work matches what [Charles] Tomlinson calls the ‘labour of observa­ tion (67). See through a poet’s eyes and language? Does he mean see by means of a poet’s eyes and language, as though a critical optometrist were urging us to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 238–266.
Published: 01 June 2012
... the gendered nature of the other’s text and his or her narrative represen- tation of voice. Wright attempted to distance his writing from Hurston’s more “feminine” narrative techniques that “cloak” her prose in “facile sen- suality” (“Their Eyes” 17), while Hurston dismissed Wright’s “masculine...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 241–247.
Published: 01 June 2006
... Modern American Poetry by Bonnie Costello Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2003. 225 pages Jane Hedley According to Webster’s dictionary, as Bonnie Costello reminds us in her final chapter, a landscape is “a portion of land that the eye can compre­ hend in a single view.” Built into that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 367–390.
Published: 01 December 2006
... that we can never really go back” (qtd. in Jackson 13)— encapsulates the real narrative of “The Untelling” and suggests the best way of reading its initial refiguration of a key Wordsworthian phrase: “the eye and progress of my song” (6.526). “The Untelling” begins thus: He leaned forward...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 352–372.
Published: 01 September 2015
... into Mr Endon’s eyes. If therefore the scene is one of intimacy, it is at the same time a parody of intimacy, and of leavetaking. Are we to understand that a kind of communion is taking place—are the eyes thus here the windows of the soul? Not, again, from this distance, which finds Murphy instead...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 119–144.
Published: 01 June 2016
... tumorous growths, severe eye pain, respiratory problems, and neurological disorders. Including 20,000 subsequent deaths, most of the 100,000 to 200,000 people suffering from serious ongoing ailments have become sick due to a massive seepage of MIC from the unsecured factory into the city’s groundwater...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 78–99.
Published: 01 March 2000
... still-life painter, the “writer has to keep his eye upon a model that moves, that changes” (Collected Essays 2: 162). She wanted to make the novel more like a work of art, while catching the movement of life itself.4 While Fry dichotomizes art and life, he “also admit[s] that under cer­ tain...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 272–276.
Published: 01 June 2011
.... Among the guests was black author Zora Neale Hurston. In order to avoid the scandal that would ensue if she arrived in the main lobby, Hurston crept up the back stairs to Rawlings’s suite, dressed as a maid. An eye-witness account of this meeting opens Crossing the Creek: The Literary Friendship...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): vi–vii.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Jahan Ramazani Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 Twentieth-Century Literature’s Andrew J. Kappel Prize in Literary Criticism, 2006 The winner of this year’s prize is Frances Dickeys “Parrot’s Eye: A Portrait by Manet and Two byT. S. Eliot.” The judge is Jahan Ramazani, Edgar F...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 546–555.
Published: 01 September 2012
...- produces part of a page from Churchill’s book on which the word “Jews” appears, now circled in red, alongside a striking photograph of SS guards handling corpses at Belsen. The image is eye-catching, and a reader might nearly overlook the original book’s caption, which fails to point out that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2000
... it like a walkingstick. Lightning will flash. I’ll grab its black knob and swing it like a crippled cane. Lightning . . . Some one’s flashing . . . some one’s flashing . . . Who in hell is flashing that mirror? Take it off me, godam you. Dan’s eyes are half blinded. He moves his...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 79–87.
Published: 01 March 2007
... natural” (207). At the end of this essay Bishop writes Off and on I have written out a poem called “Grandmother’s Glass Eye” which should be about the problem of writing poet­ ry. The situation o f my grandmother strikes me as rather like the situation of the poet: the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 305–335.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Hammer notes, “Hands and eyes are the parts of the body that fashion bonds in Crane’s poetry, and the marks that they frequently bear testify to the extreme difficulty of this task: ‘blamed bleeding hands’ in ‘For the Marriage of Faustus and Helen,’ the swimmers’ ‘lost morning eyes’ in ‘Voyages...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 461–486.
Published: 01 December 2002
... as he walks along Sandymount Strand in the “Pro­ teus” chapter is the question of perception: how does one conceive the world if not through the eyes? The visible world is an “ineluctable mo­ dality”—providing signs to read (or “signatures”) even in natural flotsam and jetsam: “seaspawn and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 709–719.
Published: 01 December 2012
...] art”? Where are we, exactly? What, in Levy’s eyes, has gone so terribly wrong? De facto sororicide, it turns out, is the story of Criminal Ingenuity, though the phrase “sister arts” is never uttered. If the book starts off with a deconstructionist, neo-Anzalduan infusion of geographic and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 374–390.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Caribbean, to instill the virtuosity of an Anansi figure in the minds of Telemachus and Odysseus. With his alternating poetic identities, Billy Blue is another of Wal­ cott’s purveyors of creative imagination. Despite his physical blindness, the Homeric poet sees with the mind’s eye...