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extinction

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2019) 65 (3): 261–288.
Published: 01 September 2019
...Helena Feder While we are increasingly challenged to imagine a world without humans, we have also become increasingly attentive to the subject of empathy, in popular culture, the humanities, and the sciences. In The Time Machine (1895), and a number of essays on evolution or extinction, H. G. Wells...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 392–410.
Published: 01 September 2015
... “things” have a life outside the realm of the human. Bowen’s fiction expresses an obvious need for objects to mean something or to represent the human, but her fiction also recognizes their inability to do so. In The Little Girls , this obsession with objects is coupled with the threat of extinction...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 289–308.
Published: 01 September 2016
... beyond authorial omnipotence. It is only through its gradual extinction that metalepsis serves the postmodern attempt to rethink the author and chart anew its peculiar subject position. In place of the clearly signposted ontological hierarchy on which the device depends, the postmodern promotes a single...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 385–404.
Published: 01 December 2017
... print the poem’s brush with extinction began to reverse course in 2003, when Grace Schulman reprinted it in The Poems of Marianne Moore . This reappearance would have been cause for celebration but for a catastrophic lapse in proofreading: Schulman’s edition reprinted only just over half of the poem...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 547–571.
Published: 01 December 2009
... “tooth-billed pigeon fortunately / survives also—” (104). Moore diverges to examine the near relatives of the pigeon, the extinct Dodo, as well as the “extinct Solitaires,” “which having ‘raised / their young one do not disunite.’ ” Moore notoriously withholds the sources for her quotations. This...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 337–344.
Published: 01 September 2016
... connection between the dearth of animal representations in modernist literature and the increased rate of species extinction and biodiversity loss at the start of the twentieth century. Some critics, Schuster writes, see the “literal depletion of animals” in modernity as “compounded by a figurative loss—the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 629–633.
Published: 01 December 2009
... domain in which a population (genotypes and phenotypes) engages in long-term interaction with the environment (survival or extinction). The evolutionary logic of cooperative behavior is the logic of this ultimate domain—the logic of genes, phenotypes, reproduction, fitness, and the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 475–498.
Published: 01 December 2017
... this candelabrum-headed ornament for a place where ornaments are scarce, sent to Alaska, was a gift preventing the extinction of the Eskimo. The battle was won by a quiet man, Sheldon Jackson, evangel to that race whose reprieve he read in the reindeer’s face. ( AG 16–17) The question the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 405–433.
Published: 01 December 2000
... resistance to the existing order (3). But my concern here is not so much with the difference between “good” and “bad” apocalypses (is total extinction “better” than selective genocide?) as with the interplay of eschatology and politics in the construction of the apocalyptic body. The basic narrative...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 193–218.
Published: 01 June 2003
... extinction of person­ ality” (Prose 43). This statement, along with the equally famous, related assertion in “The Metaphysical Poets” that “poets in our civilization, as it exists at present, must be difficult” (65), achieved, during the New Crit­ ical era, the status of doctrine, and came to be...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 32–45.
Published: 01 March 2003
... prodigious knowl­ edge of Western classical and religious traditions. 2. Wharton writes in “The Criticism of Fiction”: France is given to lamenting the extinction of the great literary critic but France should know more about the average of so-called literary criticism in other countries...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 105–113.
Published: 01 March 2011
..., Frederick Barthelme) are, from Giles’s perspective, regional—or “metaregional” (242)—writers. Where nineteenth-century regionalism mapped the “enclosed communities” that war-born technologies made extinct, these contemporary writers map the “volatile and virtualized” communities that thrive...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 405–413.
Published: 01 September 2014
... and freshness over prayer’s communal and institutional ties, frames and fictionalizes itself in a way that prayer cannot, privileges self- consciousness rather than self-extinction, and values language above all. Poetry’s means do not serve prayer’s ends, and vice-versa. All the same, modern...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 265–272.
Published: 01 June 2018
... decline and extinction, this refusal to univocally sentimentalize the past or to flesh out historical phantasms results in a “deep ambivalence about the political outcomes of historical investigations” (106) and “repudiat[es] . . . the idea that local knowledge offers privileged access to meaning” (114...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 280–286.
Published: 01 June 2015
... establishing the scope and context of the outbreak of HIV/AIDS diagnoses as a platform for discord, here she considers the extinction of bird species (a cornerstone of the plot of The Echo Maker ) in order to establish a framework for the analysis of Powers’s novel. Instead of physical sickness in the human...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... atomic weapons and their Japanese victims. As Sharp describes, Hersey’s work played an important role in constructing a postwar conception of atomic apocalypse as a combi­ nation of instantaneous obliteration and gradual, agonizing extinction. Ed­ ward J. Ahearn, discussing novels by Peter Ackroyd...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 166–192.
Published: 01 June 2008
... elegy on the extinction of intrinsic value. Hobbes’s despair, in Leviathan, 173 David Sherman arises from the extinction of personal identity, which he in turn identifies with intrinsic value in the person of the young Royal­ ist Sidney Godolphin, killed in the Civil War. This...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 597–617.
Published: 01 December 2009
... it is all going to end, is this how his line is going to run out, like water dribbling into the earth?” (199). The imagined extinction of his line puts Lurie in the same doomed category as Ettinger, who defends his heavily fortified land with guns and dogs. His only son has returned to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 447–471.
Published: 01 December 2011
... inconsistencies are far more staggering than that. The scientific dating of the Martian extinction to approximately the time of the Cretaceous- Paleogene extinction event on Earth makes it impossible that there could be any genetic or cultural line of descent between Martians and humans, since Homo sapiens...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 449–482.
Published: 01 December 2018
... art pictures moments of stilled, intersubjective intimacy against the backdrop of an endlessly unfurling deep time, a nature heedless of the chance extinctions of individual consciousnesses. Mrs. Ramsay in To the Lighthouse imaginatively turns the tables for a moment, apportioning more-than-human...