1-20 of 95 Search Results for

epic

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
...John J. Su Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 ULI Epic of Failure: Disappointment as Utopian Fantasy in Midnight's Children John J. Su And so, by a strange and melancholy paradox, the moment of failure is the moment of value; the comprehending and experi­ encing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 460–483.
Published: 01 December 2015
... postcoloniality pervading mid-twentieth-century Irish culture and politics through negative epic forms, forms that reconfigure both realist and modernist conventions. In The Last September , landscape description reframes the scope of epic conventions and challenges narratives of geopolitical development, while...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 379–402.
Published: 01 December 2016
...Frank Capogna This article argues that the modern museum offered modernist writer H.D. an institutional context through which she negotiated the possibilities for women’s experiences of—and participation in—otherwise exclusionary narratives of cultural history. In the novel Asphodel and the epic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 433–435.
Published: 01 December 2004
...Thomas Henthorne Colonial Odysseys: Empire and Epic in the Modernist Novel , by Adams David , Ithaca : Cornell University Press , 2003 . 249 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2004 A Conradian Odyssey Colonial Odysseys: Empire and Epic in the Modernist Novel by David Adams...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 174–190.
Published: 01 June 2002
.... The Wanderings of Oisin was a symbolist lyric awakened to epic de­ signs by the imperatives of cultural reconstruction. Thereafter,Yeats’s na­ tionalist and epic impulses were increasingly channeled into prose and verse dramas like Cathleen ni Houlihan (1902) and On Baile’s Strand (1904...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 164–173.
Published: 01 March 2013
... of poetry—are beautifully done. Paying equal attention to American and British poets, Bryant devotes two chapters to modernist women poets, three to poets after. She first looks at H. D.’s late epic long poem, Helen in Egypt, within the context of popular historical epic films that re...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 374–390.
Published: 01 September 2001
... regularly undertaken the re-envisioning of other writers’ works through­ out his career. Notable examples include The Sea at Dauphin (1954), based on Synge’s Riders to the Sea; The Joker of Seville (1974), after Tirso de Mo­ lina’s El Burlador de Sevilla; and his epic Omeros (1990), drawn from Ho­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 245–253.
Published: 01 June 2010
..., Puranas, and Epics—a primarily Sanskrit literature (Bhatt 12). Today, the drive to reassert a specifically Hindu iden- tity has reinflamed the political scene, with modern readings by scholars of the Hindu epics the Rāmāyana and the Mahābhārata competing with or living uneasily alongside...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 272–279.
Published: 01 June 2015
... to liberation as any kind of brazen frontal assault is likely to. The Merrill of Hammer’s biography is not only a poet whose meditations on personal love and loss are among the most enchanting lyrics produced in the twentieth century, not only a poet who wrote a hypnotic spiritual epic about...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 273–297.
Published: 01 September 2007
... says, “is the epic o f an age in which the extensive totality o f life is no 279 Timothy Bewes longer directly given, in which the immanence o f meaning in life has become a problem, yet w hich still thinks in terms o f totality” (56). The Theory of the Novel, w ritten in the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 318–324.
Published: 01 September 2004
... extent is incorporated in the center or defines a new center” (115).To instantiate such a claim, Dasenbrock goes on to draw broad parallels between the epic ambitions of Pound and Walcott and their mutual engagements with Homer and Dante. In his view, it was Pound “who showed Walcott...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 410–417.
Published: 01 September 2008
... appears in her chapter on Joyce. For Walkowitz, “Joyce’s critique of decorum needs to be understood as an effort to revise liter­ ary conventions of national belonging and political assertion” (56). To make this case she develops a convincing argument about Joyce’s interest in “epic triviality...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 378–392.
Published: 01 September 2009
... a more personal, at times even autobiographical story; his use of a different setting; his greater interest in women characters, especially Molly/Penelope; and his technique of telling the story from the characters’ perspectives rather than a Homeric epic narrator’s (112–14...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 401–409.
Published: 01 September 2008
... disillusion; story, questioning; divinely sanctioned hes, the private and pubhc deceits that strangle young lives epic trag­ edy, the struggle for an international civilization” (67). Deceived by the archaic detritus of civilization’s outmoded patriotic projects, classically trained youth...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 393–400.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Owen features in all but one of the 13 essays. The essay that doesn’t mention him, “England’s Epic?” about The Golden Warrior (1948) by Hope Muntz, is the shortest, at only seven pages long. Stallworthy’s book is about survivors’ songs “From Maldon to the Somme,” but it is closer to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 447–471.
Published: 01 December 2011
... particular place. Contemporary writers and filmmakers, therefore, often seek to revive certain dimensions of classical epic, the premodern genre that did seek to encompass the entire known world, and of modern epic, the genre that for the last two hundred years has aimed to portray the modern world...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 417–423.
Published: 01 September 2015
... asserting a radical Afrocentric cultural memory. The traditional griotte functions as a “transmitter of a shared past,” narrating family genealogies more than the epic genealogies associated with the griot (117). This role is most notable in the preface to We a BaddDDD People , where Sanchez celebrates the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Pilfering.” 48.4 (2002): 461-486 120 Index Stein, Gertrude. See Olson Stewart, Jack. “A ‘Need of Distance and Blue’: Space, Color, and Creativity in To the Lighthouse." 46.1 (2000): 78-99 Styron, William. See Carstens Su, John J. “Epic of Failure: Disappointment as Utopian Fantasy in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 540–545.
Published: 01 September 2012
... according to their degree of social engagement. Once upon a time, epic was rated a worthier genre than lyric for rather similar reasons, but now it seems an idle enough trade. Grausam 541 David H. Evans sometimes seems to imply that there is something disreputable about the autotelic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 431–443.
Published: 01 December 2001
.... John Su’s essay, like Hogan’s, examines the politics of Midnight’s Chil­ dren by revisiting the question of form. Following several other critics, Su perceives a critique of epic values in the book. However, for him, the most provocative aspect of this critique lies not in the novel’s implicit...