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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 75–96.
Published: 01 March 2008
...Michael L. Ross Copyright © Hofstra University 2008 On a Darkling Planet: Ian McEwan s Saturday and the Condition of England Michael L. Ross /A lthough Ian McEwan’s recent best seller Saturday maintains through­ out a conspicuous air of up-to-the-minute internationalism, that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 305–329.
Published: 01 September 2015
... figure of the hyena upon which the accident is blamed, it proposes that the novel advances an indeterminate ethics of alterity that prefigures the insights of Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. Tracing the cultural histories of the hyena in West and South Asia, as well as in England, it argues that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 373–391.
Published: 01 September 2015
...Sam Wiseman Through her work, the Dorset-born Mary Butts (1890–1937) expresses a quintessentially modernist tension between a deep sense of attachment to rural England and the allure of cosmopolitan modernity. This article argues that the adventure and power promised by the latter inform Butts’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 347–370.
Published: 01 September 2018
.... It argues that Woolf’s equation of synchronic time, water, and the landscape of the Scottish Hebrides expresses an important turning point in England’s imperial-oceanic sensibility, including the ways in which “Britishness” was conceived relative to a devolving archipelago. Ultimately, Woolf’s novel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 25–46.
Published: 01 March 2010
... their heads. (227) Where Rhoda had hoped that the ostensible solidities of England’s his- tory might offer consolation in the wake of loss, through Bernard these solidities are demystified. National identity is merely “a trick of the mind” that cannot offer meaning to soothe disheveled souls...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 131–163.
Published: 01 June 2003
... in which the menagerie of the 1860s itself disrupts the provincial, and the narrative goes so far as to imply that the elephant has killed off “mid-Victorian England.” Finally, the elephant’s symbolic violence prefigures Lewis’s “blasting” and “the sound of breaking and falling...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 449–471.
Published: 01 December 2003
... as England’s bor­ der. In the scene recounted above, her dawning realization that sexuality is also an issue alerts her to the complexities of England’s spatial logic. Laura also realizes that she cannot simply reverse this complex logic because it is embedded in the spaces she...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
... the more distant ironies of someone like Farrukh Dhondy. Dhondy reserves his political polemic for his writing based in England, plays such as The Bride 600 Salman Rushdie: The Ambivalence of Migrancy and short-story collections such as Brick Lane, which take as their sub­ jects the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 238–268.
Published: 01 June 2000
... advertising practices developed in England during the nineteenth century and the promotional tactics that the suffragettes deployed during the early twentieth century. Less obviously, Blast’s use of advertising aesthetics and practices engaged in part with the promotional theories of the two...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 March 2012
... is deeply invested in the question of Englishness, signaling Bennett’s concerns with larger issues of nation and identity. The Grand Babylon Hotel is filled almost entirely with non-English characters, while within its walls the Imperial Palace offers a miniature reproduction of England...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 463–470.
Published: 01 December 2016
..., changes, and additions that distinguish the final two-volume version (published by Collins and Havill in England and in one volume in the United States by Harper and Row) from the three-volume manuscript version (which itself exists in two versions). In Maslen’s description, “Large chunks of self...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 105–114.
Published: 01 March 2008
... Shaw’s dramatic endeavors and gives particular attention to the problems Shaw faced when he attempted to dramatize the life of a prostitute turned madam. Mrs. Warren’s Profession was “precensored” in England by the Examiner of Plays and only reached a limited audience in print form as part...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 173–208.
Published: 01 June 2015
... American audience in these days to refrain from saying a word in regard to the relations between [England and America], and especially the change that has come during the last few weeks and months, with the Russian Revolution and the entry of the United States into the European conflict. It was impossible...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 47–74.
Published: 01 March 2008
... literature that has devolved aesthetically, albeit as a special case, from British and Irish literature. This regional literature can be placed alongside that developing in Scodand, Wales, and parts of England outside the Home Counties, such as northern England. R. P. Draper has recently discussed...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 324–347.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., w ithout relations or money; they must work and stick to each other till death. But England belonged to them. — Forster, Maurice 208—09 I n October 1912, the successful, 33-year-old novelist E. M. Forster sailed from England in search o f...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 34–53.
Published: 01 March 2011
... within him. How much longer before the wound stops bleeding? How much longer will he have to grit his teeth and endure before he is able to say, “Once upon a time I used to live in South Africa but now I live in England?” (116) Through John’s fear of writing, and through these...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 273–306.
Published: 01 September 2008
... (469) O n 1 May 1935 Virginia and Leonard Woolf set out by car from Har­ wich, England, for a month-long tour of Europe, a trip that would take them through Holland, Germany, Italy, and into France. Prior to their de­ parture, Harold Nicolson, a member of the British diplomatic service and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): v–vii.
Published: 01 June 2003
...: “While Bennett is concerned to recuperate from mid- Victorian fiction a cosmopolitan distance and reserve under the banner of the ‘modern,’ the modern England that supplants John Baines’s is bound up with empire and with excess” (153). Hence an unqualified affirmation or even celebration of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 59–78.
Published: 01 March 2014
... account, leaving him destitute at novel’s end. Amis suggests that Money, published in 1984, “could have been set any time” (“Domestic” 61) and that its setting in 1981 is by and large arbitrary, but nevertheless it is widely accepted as a satire of  Thatcher’s England, a time that lives in the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2010
... two poems also refer to two of the three most important people in Eliot’s first years in England, “Hysteria” to Vivienne Haigh- Wood, the Englishwoman Eliot met in the spring of 1915 and precipi- tously married in June that year, and “Mr. Apollinax” to Bertrand Russell, Eliot’s Harvard...