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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 597–617.
Published: 01 December 2009
...Deirdre Coleman Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 The “Dog-Man”: Race, Sex, Species, and Lineage in Coetzee’s Disgrace The “Dog-Man”: Race, Sex, Species, and Lineage in Coetzee’s Disgrace Deirdre Coleman In J. M. Coetzee’s most recent novel, Summertime, Sophie Denoël, one of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 467–490.
Published: 01 December 2005
...Tom Herron Copyright © Hofstra University 2005 Ml The Dog Man: Becoming Animal in Coetzee’s Disgrace Tom Herron Crossing borders or the ends of man I come or surrender to the animal—to the animal in itself, to the animal in me and the ani­ mal at unease with...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 137–168.
Published: 01 June 2001
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 271–288.
Published: 01 September 2016
...Joseph Anderton Focusing on Franz Kafka’s “Investigations of a Dog” (1922), Samuel Beckett’s Molloy (1955), and Paul Auster’s Timbuktu (1999), this essay reflects on how these works represent the fundamental unknowability of animal perspectives while at the same time suggesting how dogs and humans...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 63–91.
Published: 01 March 2015
... monumentalizing tendencies that dogged it after the First World War and suggests a broader purpose for what might strike many as an antiquated poetic genre. Woolf’s critique of elegy is political, ethical, and generic, as she rewrites the terms of the genre to make visible the mourners and subjects that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 348–361.
Published: 01 September 2002
... views on her project. As a dog story, Flush belongs to a subgenre o f the literary animal story. The first successful English novel w ith an animal protagonist is Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty (1877). Sewell deploys the conventions o f Vic­ torian first-person narrative in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 448–471.
Published: 01 December 2008
... ones. This first becomes apparent in “Bloodfits,” which explicitly echoes Bishop’s “Five Flights Up”: As inevitable as a barking dog, second-hand music drifts down five flights of stairs and out into the street, adjusting seams, checking makeup in pocket mirror. (Your Name...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 535–539.
Published: 01 December 2007
... Engagement” (Players, Running Dog, Ama­ zons, and Engineer of Moonlight) again prompt questions about Dewey’s rubrics: isn’t End Zone also about failed engagement? Isn’t Pammy Wynant’s trajectory in Players a retreat? Dewey himself admits that there’s little distinction here: discussing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 42–60.
Published: 01 March 2006
... and last names of everyone at an entire dinner party: “I knew a dog that could do that,” said Zoe with her mouth full. Murray and the wife looked and her with vexed and rebuking expressions, but the husband seemed suddenly twinkling and amused. Zoe swallowed. “It was a Talking...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): vi–vii.
Published: 01 June 2006
... literature, such as Ulysses and The Waste Land—hence the suggestiveness of this essay’s central insight. Having carefully pried open this dual possibility, the author explores it with an almost dogged precision and intensity. The essay looks back to Descartes to rethink the foundational split...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 179–209.
Published: 01 June 2005
... qualities emerged from a poet who was emotionally troubled and deeply unconventional. Merrill explored the complexities of Bishop’s character in four poems. “The Victor Dog” (1972) was dedicated to her; the brief “Her Craft” (1977) was written in lieu of a requested essay about her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 141–166.
Published: 01 June 2004
... Woolf engages significantly with 159 Kirstie Blair gypsies: her unpublished short story “Gipsy, the Mongrel” (1940). Written for her agent, who requested a dog story, this brief sentimental narrative about the (male) narrator’s affection for a dog makes a slightly unsettling link between...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 86–104.
Published: 01 March 2011
... culminating in Disgrace is one of the great cycles of uneasily reconciled “transcendent immanence” in our time: characterized by a dogged sty- listic “degree zero” alongside which it is impossible to deny a powerful ethical charge and allegorical overtone, thanks to the electric power of the plotting...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2012
... acknowledge the debt she owes to those who have given her life its particular luster: one must “repay in daily life to servants, yes, to dogs and canaries, above all to Richard her husband, who was the founda- tion of it” (28-29). For all Clarissa’s biocentric exuberance, what informs 187Twentieth...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 305–329.
Published: 01 September 2015
.... These are added to other traditions about them: hyenas can imitate the calls of humans to lure people to their death, if they circle a person or a dog three times it becomes paralyzed, their shadows can deprive people and dogs of voice, they dig up graves and eat corpses, witches ride on them, and so on...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 231–239.
Published: 01 June 2016
... mingling of care and desire are gestured toward during Robin’s concluding transaction with the dog: whereas the rest of the novel employs analogy to emphasize the gap between bios and logos , the end eliminates this gap through an absence of analogy. If, as this ending signifies, Robin is a way out of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 107–114.
Published: 01 March 2017
... dressed in suit and tie, impatient with inflated rhetoric or unorthodox behavior” (130). Against that image, Quinn’s reading of Holub’s “A Dog in the Quarry” alongside Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s “Dog” indexes Holub’s “indebtedness” (129) to the Beats. This chapter also weighs the effects on Holub’s poetics...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 396–404.
Published: 01 December 2000
... artist’s soul. Since completing his masterpiece, Rubek has made a career carving animal faces into and beneath the likenesses of his wealthy patrons. He gives them “worthy horse faces and the stubborn muzzles of mules—lop-eared, low-browed dog skulls, and pampered pig snouts—and every so often, the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 547–571.
Published: 01 December 2009
... other early Paris poems prefigure later ones that are anxious about propagation and queerness, namely “Pink Dog” and “Crusoe in England,” both published in the 1970s. 555 Susan McCabe Figure 1. Pigeons. Illustrated London News 18:48 (1851). (Secord 164) Figure 2. Pigeons...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 12–31.
Published: 01 March 2003
... “appears to be carrying a plastic bag of dog shit” (217). Sedaris thus stakes out a special intercultural slot for himself. He is clearly not to be mistaken for the typical American, here or there, but he also 17 Edward C. Knox has no qualms about doing “everything possible to keep our...