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desire

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 20–38.
Published: 01 March 2001
...James Najarian Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 ULI “Greater Love” : Wilfred Owen, Keats, and a Tradition of Desire James Najarían ilfred Owen is still, to some extent, a prisoner of his saindy repu­ tation. Though the most recent biography of Owen, by Helen...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 141–166.
Published: 01 June 2004
...Kirstie Blair Copyright © Hofstra University 2004 41 Gypsies and Lesbian Desire: Vita Sackville-West,Violet Trefusis, and Virginia Woolf Kirstie Blair Long Barn, Knole, Richmond and Bloomsbury. All too familiar and entrapping. Either I am at home, and you are strange; or...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 482–488.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Timothy Parrish Philip Roth—Countertexts, Counterlives , by Shostak Debra , Columbia : University of South Carolina Press , 2004 . 332 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 You Must Change Your Life: Gender, Desire, and Philip Roth Philip Roth—Countertexts...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 58–79.
Published: 01 March 2009
...Graham Fraser Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 HI The Calligraphy of Desire: Barthes, Sade, and Beckett’s H ow It Is Graham Fraser One is the victim of everything one writes. —Samuel Beckett (qtd. in Abbott 109) “ Ti f something is ‘communicated’ in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 269–278.
Published: 01 June 2009
...John C. Charles Once You Go Black: Choice, Desire, and the Black American Intellectual , by Reid-Pharr Robert , New York : New York University Press , 2007 . 208 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2009 Review Desire, Agency, and Black American Subjectivity Once You Go...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 528–534.
Published: 01 December 2015
...Brian Gollnick Cosmopolitan Desires: Global Modernity and World Literature in Latin America , by Siskind Mariano . Evanston : Northwestern University Press , 2014 . 328 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2015 Mariano Siskind’s Cosmopolitan Desires: Global Modernity and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 153–181.
Published: 01 June 2007
...Benjamin Schreier Copyright © Hofstra University 2007 u \ Desire’s Second Act: “Race” and The Great Gatsby’s Cynical Americanism Benjamin Schreier I once thought that there were no second acts in American lives. —Fitzgerald, “My Lost City” (31) F e w...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 75–93.
Published: 01 March 2017
... the personal force of individual desire plays out on a broader structural level as Baldwin’s gay plot is drawn toward the magnetically forceful heterosexual love triangle in Hemingway’s tale. Hemingway and Baldwin address gender normativity and sexual inadequacy from a particular American perspective...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 329–358.
Published: 01 September 2017
... publishing as a novelist and in sustained composition. Through paying close attention to Ellison’s compositional style in Invisible Man , in addition to his work in the essay form, this account shows that despite Ellison’s desire to publish the novel, his approach to novel-writing indicates his investment in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 275–294.
Published: 01 September 2018
... aesthetic. This essay argues, however, that what Corregidora affirms most strongly is not a more accurate (because more traumatic) history but rather what Stephen Best has recently called the desire to make the past present. What Ursa Corregidora struggles to realize in the novel is precisely the pastness...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010
... discussions of the work of Virginia  Woolf use just about every possible word except bisexual to describe her portrayal of desire. Since bisexual was rarely used to describe a sexual identity type until the 1960s, it might seem anachronistic to use the word to describe the coexistence of sexual...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2010
...- nonexclusionary polymorphous mutability of desire” in order to set up the essay’s ambitious plan to offer us a new and newly produc- tive way to read representations of same-sex desire in Woolf’s work. Courageously eschewing Woolf critics’ frequent use of autobiog- raphy as an interpretive tool, it posits...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 413–442.
Published: 01 December 2006
... pecuniary emulation, Sister Carrie depicts clothing and accessories as the principle objects of desire and media of seduction. These commodities speak for capitalism, and their discourses are narratives o f desiredesire for the production of an idealized subjectivity through the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 414–420.
Published: 01 September 2007
...Carrie J. Preston Gender, Desire, and Sexuality in T. S. Eliot , edited by Laity Cassandra Gish Nancy K. , Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2004 . 265 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2007 You! hypocrite lecteur! New Readings of T. S. Eliot Gender...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 405–413.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Randi Saloman The Passions of Modernism: Eliot, Yeats, Woolf, and Mann , by Cuda Anthony , Columbia : University of South Carolina Press , 2010 . 235 pages. Modernism, Memory, and Desire: T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf , by McIntire Gabrielle , Cambridge : Cambridge...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 175–208.
Published: 01 June 2009
... the case where gender and sexuality are concerned. While the novel seems to function within a standard heterosexual logic and to trace the vicissitudes of an easily attributable and culturally disciplined Oedipal desire, a closer examination reveals that gender and sexuality are never...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 369–386.
Published: 01 September 2000
... is proof of a motivation or desire on the part of the narrator to tell his or her story, often 370 DURAS’S “MONSIEUR X. that same narrative also contains textual evidence of the anxieties or fears its narrator experiences in telling it. “Monsieur X.” is just such a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 88–91.
Published: 01 March 2007
... (such as those proposed by Benedict Anderson, Ernest Gellner, George Mosse, and Anne McClintock) and theories of genealogy (as articulated in the works of Michel Foucault and Friedrich Nietzsche), Weinbaum’s first chapter uses Kate Chopin’s short story “Désirée’s Baby” to prove how...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
... narration that powerfully expresses male homoerotic desire while shrewdly main­ taining the veneer of heterosexual conventionality. By nineteenth-century standards the tableau is not necessarily un­ usual; Forster is not unique in allowing his narrators to indulge in de...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 336–366.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., especially Christian and Freudian accounts of desire, worship, creation, childhood, and motherhood. Smith reveals that these psychoanalytic and religious frameworks, which seem utterly opposed, are both invested in the Narcissus narrative in similar ways: they preemptively erase Echo from the picture...