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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 518–529.
Published: 01 December 2007
...Robert Boyers Modernism: The Lure of Heresy , by Gay Peter , New York : W.W. Norton , 2007 . 610 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2007 w Reviews Modernism, Dead or Alive Modernism: The Lure of Heresy by Peter Gay NewYork:W.W. Norton, 2007. 610 pages Robert Boyers...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 56–77.
Published: 01 March 2000
...Andrea P. Zemgulys Copyright © Hofstra University 2000 “Night and Day Is Dead”: Virginia Woolf in London “Literary and Historic” Andrea P. Zemgulys [We] don’t want the [Hogarth] Press to be a fashionable hobby patronised and inspired...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 396–404.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Elinor Fuchs Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 The Apocalyptic Ibsen: When We Dead Awaken E l in o r Fu c h s And four great beasts came up from the sea The second, like a bear. It was raised up on one side, and had three ribs in its...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 387–412.
Published: 01 December 2018
...Chad Bennett This article reveals the formative interplay between the queer art of gossip and poetic practice in James Merrill’s The Changing Light at Sandover , a sprawling verse trilogy composed with the unlikely assistance of a Ouija board. The poem’s extensive gossip with the dead is often...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 359–364.
Published: 01 September 2017
... losses do we incur when we’re seldom if ever in rooms with the dead? And how might the virtual spaces of the aesthetic give quarter to the strangeness of the corpse’s demand? Luminous and serious in treating these questions, David Sherman’s In a Strange Room looks at how Anglophone modernism responded...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 166–192.
Published: 01 June 2008
... the dead. Mourning as Hill represents it, then, is not a recuperation of self but the sacrifice of its sovereignty in an absolute responsibility for the other—an absolute responsibility in which, as Levinas describes it, the self is hostage to the other. That elegy has something to do with...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 575–595.
Published: 01 December 2013
... epiphanyish visitation” (833). One such set of moments occurs when Wallace rewrites the epiphany of lovelessness that concludes “The Dead.” When Gabriel learns about Michael Furey’s sacrifice for Gabriel’s own wife, his eyes fill with “generous tears. He had never felt like that himself towards any...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 223–246.
Published: 01 June 2018
..., for M. de Gourmont was only fifty-seven, and if he had not been worried to death, if he had not been grieved to death by the cessation of all that has been “life” as he understood it, there was no reason why we should not have had more of his work and his company. He is as much “dead of the war” as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 519–527.
Published: 01 December 2015
... disinter the dead, or how the trope of birds potently conveys the embodied struggles of migration and dislocation, or how literary genres like autobiography become subject to judicial cross-examination, Schlund-Vials skillfully integrates aesthetic, political, historical, and juridical considerations into...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 72–91.
Published: 01 March 2001
... The Waste Land—with its archduke, canals, rats, dead men, its “setting of blasted landscape,” its “fo­ cus on fear”— is more profoundly a “memory o f war” than one had thought (325-26). He cites similar remarks by Hugh Kenner on some of Pound’s early cantos (326...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 20–38.
Published: 01 March 2001
... moment that she picks Lorenzo’s decomposing head out of his grave. At the same time, Owen’s speaker imagines the dead men’s “muscled bodies.” Significantly, the closeted Siegfried Sassoon edited the “muscled bodies” out of Owen’s draft o f the poem (Complete Poems and Fragments 1:138...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 259–262.
Published: 01 June 2005
... Union Dead,” emphasizing the dramatically unresolved tensions in Lowell’s rep­ resentation of such watershed moments in American history as the Civil War, the Civil Rights Movement, and the dropping of the atom bomb. In Rotella’s view, Lowell’s poem achieves its off-kilter combination of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 421–448.
Published: 01 December 2003
... the soldiers’ war” (102). In fact, for me the central narrative challenge of Testament of Youth is Brittain’s effort to resolve the tension between the conflicting roles of active participant (as nurse) and passive spectator (as mourner of the dead)—though, as we will see, mourning cannot...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 107–115.
Published: 01 March 2010
... place, a hard shut dry cold black place, where nothing stirs, nothing speaks and that I listen, and that I seek, like a caged beast born of caged beasts born of caged beasts born of caged beasts born in a cage and dead in a cage, born and then dead, born in a cage and then...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 63–91.
Published: 01 March 2015
... participation has a critical edge to it. The elegy in The Waves reveals the genre’s flaws: the voices of other mourners are lost, representation of the dead lies vulnerable to manipulation for the poet’s benefit, and other, perhaps worthier, subjects and speakers of elegy are ignored—all in order to fit the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... thinkers with very different politi­ cal bearings uttered quite similar apocalyptic responses to the social changes of their time, statements that have come to stand as touchstones for moder­ nity: Matthew Arnold’s reference to “wandering between two worlds, one dead, the other powerless to be born...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 467–490.
Published: 01 December 2005
... academic. More than this, it occurs when David enters the widest reaches of the disgrace provoked initially by his affair with a student and then exacerbated terribly by the rape of his daughter; when surrounded as he is by abandoned, dying, and dead animals (those whose period of grace is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 269–284.
Published: 01 September 2000
... of his beholding. Yet the tone of “Follower’s initial persona suggests something different from longing or regret: relief, maybe even accomplishment. Homages to the dead can also serve the in­ 269 TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE terests of the living, and it is not unusual for...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 246–275.
Published: 01 June 2003
... the dead by the socioeconomic laws of exchange, equivalence, and progress (Ramazani 14). Critics frequently cite the poems and pref­ aces of Wilfred Owen and Eliots Waste Land as watersheds heralding both the arrival of this new literary phenomenon and a virtually univer­ sal cynicism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 193–218.
Published: 01 June 2003
... establish a relationship with dead au­ thors, suggests a belief in poetic production as a mode of prophecy. The poet’s “extinction of personality” occurs not simply in the manner de­ fined by New Criticism as the absence of traces of the author’s life in his work but instead as a process of initiation...