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darwin

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 268–282.
Published: 01 September 2004
...Zachariah Pickard Copyright © Hofstra University 2004 BAI Natural History and Epiphany: Elizabeth Bishop’s Darwin Letter Zachariah Pickard riting in his Autobiography about the joys of beetle collecting and, particularly, the pleasure of discovering a new...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 423–444.
Published: 01 December 2009
...Jonathan Greenberg Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 This content is made freely available by the publisher. It may not be redistributed or altered. All rights reserved. Introduction: Darwin and Literary Studies Introduction: Darwin and Literary Studies Jonathan Greenberg...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 547–571.
Published: 01 December 2009
...Susan McCabe Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 Survival of the Queerly Fit: Darwin, Marianne Moore, and Elizabeth Bishop Survival of the Queerly Fit: Darwin, Marianne Moore, and Elizabeth Bishop Susan McCabe Darwin taught us that animals (like literary texts) are cultural...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 640–644.
Published: 01 December 2009
...Daniel A. Novak Darwin’s Camera: Art and Photography in the Theory of Evolution , by Prodger Philip , Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009 . 320 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 Daniel A. Novak Darwin at the Edge of the Visible Darwin’s Camera: Art and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 449–482.
Published: 01 December 2018
... anthropological, heritage—when she represents characters’ undeserved, uncompensated pains. Woolf’s thinking aligns her with Charles Darwin in the natural sciences. Like Darwin, Woolf makes tragic chance inseparable from the theater of life. This essay reads Woolf’s oft-cited rejection of teleological form and her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 572–596.
Published: 01 December 2009
...Keith Leslie Johnson Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 Keith Leslie Johnson Darwin’s Bulldog and Huxley’s Ape Keith Leslie Johnson One of the initial difficulties in assessing the impact of a figure like Darwin on literary history is determining to what extent his...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 385–404.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Heather Cass White This essay presents the textual history of Moore’s “lost” poem “Pigeons” and argues for the poem’s importance in unifying two major strains of Moore criticism: that pertaining to her Protestant faith, and that pertaining to her careful reading of Darwin. The essay suggests that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 634–639.
Published: 01 December 2009
... time the twenty-three- year-old Charles Darwin saw the island of Tierra del Fuego off South America and an epilogue that captures Darwin’s first impressions of the Galápagos Islands. These encounters during Darwin’s trip on the Beagle in the 1830s have come to be regarded as central...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 93–124.
Published: 01 June 2007
...Jonathan Greenberg Copyright © Hofstra University 2007 HI Why Can’t Biologists Read Poetry? Ian McEwan s Enduring Love Jonathan Greenberg Since the reinvention of social Darwinism as sociobiology in the 1970s, and particularly since the reinvention of sociobiology as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 277–284.
Published: 01 June 2011
... to—“the Darwin Letter,” the famous letter of 1964 to Anne Stevenson in which Bishop writes that Dreams, works of art (some) glimpses of the always-more-suc- cessful surrealism of everyday life, unexpected moments of em- pathy (is it catch a peripheral vision of whatever it is one...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 445–484.
Published: 01 December 2009
... Stein’s early life. Charles Darwin is perhaps the great arbiter standing behind her conception of habit. She picks up on an undercurrent of his argument—that repetition is a useful, indeed a nec- essary, part of human sociality—and explores its reach and consequence. Like him, she concentrates...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 411–416.
Published: 01 September 2015
.... Defining vitalist philosophy as the “focus on emergent processes that develop in unpredictable ways and sustain themselves by means of their internal logic” (3), Moses draws together the evolutionary theories of Charles Darwin with the work of Henri Bergson, William James, and Friedrich Nietzsche, in order...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 556–581.
Published: 01 December 2012
..., expressing it in explicitly Darwinian terms: The process of “natural selection,” as Mr. Darwin called it, co- operating with a tendency to variation and to inheritance of variations, he has shown to be a chief cause . . . of that evolution 556Twentieth-Century Literature 58.4...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2007
... psychoanalytical debate. Rendered harmonious by what I would call an interpretive tour de force, these differing and disso­ nant discourses are aimed at offering “less a Darwinian reading of culture than a cultural reading of Darwinism” on the disciplinary basis of the humanities, especially literary...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 88–91.
Published: 01 March 2007
... object of scientific scrutiny and a matter of increasing social exigency. In this chapter Weinbaum juxtaposes Darwin’s Sexual Selection with Freud’s essay “The Aetiology of Hysteria” to demonstrate how “racialization is intimately bound up with women’s sexual agency and wayward desire...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 510–546.
Published: 01 December 2009
... (Cosmides and Tooby).2 Perhaps because of the field’s current aura of both glamour and threat, scholars have paid little attention to its own evolution. The notion of an evolutionary psychology actually arose along with Darwinism in the late nineteenth century, much earlier than the 1975 academic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 485–509.
Published: 01 December 2009
... Darwin’s evolutionary biology to imply that willed, targeted interference with evolutionary processes causes mostly pain, since all living beings have evolved in conjunction with their environments. While Pygmalion—not Moreau—is sometimes read as an educational success story, the works are equally...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 597–617.
Published: 01 December 2009
... in the character of Lurie between two ver- sions of Darwinism. The first version, cloaked in the disinterested pose of scientific, anthropological enquiry, soon reveals that it sees struggle and competition in racial as well as sexual and generational terms. The second version moves away from...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2012
... figuratively as metaphors for human characters or literally as the Dalloways’ beloved companions, one of whom can be heard howling during Clarissa’s party. But animals provoke special anxiety when they can be seen looking out from human faces. Septimus Warren Smith, an avid reader of Darwin and a Great...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2000
... the dawn” (Singers 77-78). On the other hand, Darwin T. Turner concludes that the title character in “Kabnis” is “weak, debauched, [and] impotent”—the latter quality elaborated in economic terms through his preparation for a profession about to be made obsolete by the automo­ bile (24-25...