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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 518–526.
Published: 01 December 2018
...Jonathan Najarian Arresting Development: Comics at the Boundaries of Literature , by Pizzino Christopher . Austin : University of Texas Press , 2016 . 231 pages. Why Comics? From Underground to Everywhere , by Chute Hillary . New York : HarperCollins , 2017 . 449...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 39–71.
Published: 01 March 2001
...Karin E. Westman Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 rA l The First Orlando: The Laugh of the Comic Spirit in Virginia Woolf’s “Friendships Gallery” Karin E. Westman The Comic Spirit laughed meanwhile. — “Friendships Gallery...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 138–145.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Zachary King “ Comics and Media ”, edited by Chute Hillary and Jagoda Patrick , Special issue, Critical Inquiry 40 , no. 3 ( 2014 ). 284 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2015 The very first thing one notices about “Comics and Media,” aside from its unmistakably...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 354–363.
Published: 01 December 2011
... a shift I can also track in my own work, which is about a subject many take as transparently “postmodern”—comics. (The form of com- ics is, broadly speaking, obviously relevant to postmodernism in that it is, unlike, say, the novel, itself an approximately twentieth-century form, and an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 546–555.
Published: 01 September 2012
...Brad Prager MetaMaus: A Look Inside a Modern Classic, Maus (Book + DVD-R) , by Spiegelman Art , Pantheon Books . 2011 . 300 pages. Graphic Women: Life Narrative & Contemporary Comics , by Chute Hillary L. , Columbia University Press . 2010 . 297 pages...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 199–230.
Published: 01 June 2006
... space as possible. The ice might be thinner than one would like to think. —Art Spiegelman (qtd. in D’Arcy 3) In In the Shadow of No Towers, his most recent book of comic strips, Art Spiegelman draws connections between his experience of 9/11 and his survivor parents...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 513–537.
Published: 01 December 2014
... be serious.” —George Orwell, “Funny, but not Vulgar” To speak of George Orwell as a comic writer may in itself seem like a bad joke: the very word “Orwellian” seems an adequate rejoinder. For over sixty years, he has been defined by a single phrase of  V. S...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 407–430.
Published: 01 September 2001
... appearance— comically out of place and generally associated with mortality. As Stephen Greenblatt notes, Shakespeare has come to represent “‘culture’ as a whole” (1), and the theme associated with Shakespeare’s grave in Hollywood lit­ erature often invokes other canonical texts as representative...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 191–214.
Published: 01 June 2002
....10 It is even odder, then, that scholars continue to attribute Ellison’s theory of the blues to his reading of French existentialism when in fact what he calls the “near-tragic, near-comic lyricism” (“Richard Wright’s Blues” 78) of the blues has more in common with Burke’s prag­ matism than...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 42–60.
Published: 01 March 2006
...Robert Chodat Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 Jokes, Fiction, and Lorrie Moore Robert Chodat T h e opening sentences of Lorrie Moore’s “You’re Ugly,Too” present a superbly comic picture of the contemporary intellectual faced with the arid, earnest culture of middle America...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 524–531.
Published: 01 September 2012
... British gentility to the Amazonian jungle where he is held captive and condemned to read Dickens to death? Greenberg’s claim—that Waugh’s comic satire collapses into the negative affective ter- ritory of the uncanny, a destination increasingly sought out by modern- ists as the new century wore on...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 445–484.
Published: 01 December 2009
... Stein’s comic im- pulses create a kind of narrative interference that undercuts the suggestion of tragic determinism underlying Melanctha’s character. For Stein, life itself is surprising, and biology is simply not destiny. Plainly, as one of three “lives,” the narrative raises the question of how...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 414–440.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Customs”) a mock- anthropological profile of Forest Lawn. He fictionalized both subjects in The Loved One, his blackly comic Hollywood novel about an undertaking business called Whispering Glades and a neighboring crematorium for pets known as the Happier Hunting Ground. Death and the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 110–117.
Published: 01 March 2016
... Color: Comic Traditions and the Rise of Realism in Popular Poetry,” together with Joseph T. Thomas, Jr.’s “Modern and Contemporary Children’s Poetry” in the final section, chart a lineage that is both familiar to many people with American childhoods and comparatively new as a subject for criticism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 434–452.
Published: 01 December 2000
... drones by contrasting them with the heroic Anthony “Buck” Rogers. Within two years, Nowlan had transformed his hero into a nationally syndicated comic strip that became known as The Adventures of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. Nowlan’s comic strip was widely popular, running for decades and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 1–8.
Published: 01 March 2011
... reflections in Youth, and given a comic and serene edge by the dialogues between Paul Rayment and Elizabeth Costello. Moreover, national prescription cedes pride of imaginary place to the web of intertextual echoes and citations that now sustains the Coetzee universe in its own unique transnational...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 377–384.
Published: 01 June 2013
... because of the humorous effect, while the comical is based on the improbability of the sequential violence happening in real life. However, Belletto insists that, in fact, all this violence is orchestrated by the author and is, therefore, not random at all. He consequently sees in Benny’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 528–535.
Published: 01 September 2013
... of personhood. The sub- 531 Joseph Jonghyun Jeon sequent two chapters, one on Asian American comics with a particular focus on Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese (2006) and the other on the work of Jhumpa Lahiri, modulate the open-ended sense of pos- sibility in Roley and Choi into...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 336–366.
Published: 01 September 2014
... specifically male behavior: “Man is most frivolous when he pronounces.” Perhaps more mischievously than frivolously, Smith frames the mother’s critical descrip- tion of the conceited “Man” in feminine rhyme: “bounces,” “trounces,” “pronounces.” This “feminized” articulation of Man’s thought comically...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 111–119.
Published: 01 March 2018
... both institutional secrecy and public fascination with the secret work of the state” (2012, 5). If intelligence agencies are, by their very nature, secret, the covert sphere, which includes novels, comics, movies, and video games, fills the information gap and provides a necessary “theater for the...