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clarissa

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 49–74.
Published: 01 March 2017
... past only by understanding how it is, in effect, preserved by our physical surroundings” (1992, 6–7), Woolf’s exploration of Clarissa Dalloway, Peter Walsh, and Septimus Warren Smith’s individual memories via glass on the streets of London complicates our sense both of what constitutes the collective...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 93–124.
Published: 01 June 2007
... Clarissa Mellon, a Keats scholar.6 Joe and Clarissa represent, fairly schematically, not only opposing disciplines but also opposing worldviews, even opposing principles: science and literature, reason and emotion, nature and culture. More specifically, they represent opposing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2012
... distinct from the cultural entity, but also challenges the very idea that the domains of the social and cultural are exclusively human. When Clarissa Dalloway ruminates on her love of life throughout a June day in 1923, she pauses to savor her “secret deposit of exquisite mo- ments” and to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 351–359.
Published: 01 June 2013
... may be aware that Clarissa continues to recover from influenza on the June day of her party, but any specifics about the disease itself seem pushed far to the margins of the narrative’s concerns. In contrast, Voigt’s Kyrie, with its sonnets voiced by multiple speakers, records conflicts and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2007
... novel to ad­ dress the problematic at hand but also what appears to be the perfect novel for doing so, because Enduring Love brings together a female literary critic (Clarissa Mellon) and a male writer of scientific journalism (Joe Rose) in a common-law marriage “going South” because of their...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 394–405.
Published: 01 September 2007
... our mind-reading capacities” (4). Starting with a set of 396 Review familiar texts (Mrs. Dalloway, Clarissa, and Lolita, among others) and add­ ing a discussion o f detective fiction (making entirely clear how little her theories depend on “high” art), Zunshine integrates the new...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 515–523.
Published: 01 September 2012
... with storylines about Laura Brown, an avid reader of Mrs Dalloway, and Clarissa Vaughan, a late-twentieth century woman whose love-life’s central dilem- ma recalls Clarissa Dalloway’s—illustrates how historiographic metafiction can prompt readers to do exactly what Saloman says that Musil’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 437–461.
Published: 01 December 2010
... upper classes. Similarly, Mrs. Dalloway recognizes the 441 Amy Clukey class structure that allows Clarissa Dalloway to make safe, comfortable, if fleeting connections with other pedestrians as she traverses London. It is not my intention to condemn metropolitan cosmopolitanism in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 34–55.
Published: 01 March 2000
... are rehearsed within the microsociety of the ship. For Clarissa Dalloway, the experience of being in the “beyond” provokes a vague and revealing idealization of “what it really means to be English”: One thinks of all we’ve done, and our navies, and the people in In­ dia and Africa, and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2010
... pointing us to the experience of various characters in other Woolf novels: Rachel Vinrace, Jacob Flanders, Clarissa Dalloway, Mr. Ramsay, Mr. Bankes, Charles Tans- ley. Orlando, however, is seen as free of such constraints, yet his/her story too demonstrates clearly both that gender is socially con...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 582–605.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of the twentieth century and during the mid eighteenth century” (41). Yount observes that not only does Ralph, at one point, allude to Richardson’s Clarissa, but the novel also reproduces aspects of Clarissa’s plot. She is interested in how Custom’s rewriting of the Clarissa plot re- enacts...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 551–558.
Published: 01 December 2010
.... “The Strange Character of Law” thereafter extends such inquiries to Mrs. Dalloway, which Reichman deciphers as likewise experimenting with expanded notions of social responsibility. Much as Clarissa Dallo- way’s travels throughout London confront her with a series of  “acciden- tal encounters...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 720–727.
Published: 01 December 2012
....” With Mrs. Dalloway her example, Olson compares the inward turn of Septimus with Clarissa’s normalizing, anxiety-absorbing immersion in “unselfconscious routines” (67). 723 Brooke Horvath Like Joyce, Woolf finds the “main quality of the ordinary” to be its elusiveness, however...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 360–368.
Published: 01 June 2013
... Wittgensteinian label of “family resemblance.” For example, where Clarissa’s decision to marry Richard Dalloway in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway provides her with the space—physical, emotional, and intellectual—to nurture her individual personhood through introspection, but does so by closing off bisexual av...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
... plainly spatial and suggests a kind of spidery, radiating model suggestive of social metaphor. This model resembles the “navelcord” that stretches across Joyce’s Dublin in Ulysses (1993, 3.36) or, in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway , the “thin thread” that connects Richard to Clarissa until, “as a single...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 39–71.
Published: 01 March 2001
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 40–66.
Published: 01 March 2007
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010
.... In Mrs. Dalloway the importance that the mature Clarissa Dalloway gives to being once kissed by Sally Seton as a young woman epitomizes Woolf’s focus on the ordi- nary. Even Orlando, who sometimes seems to imagine himself/herself to be extraordinary, is in important ways quite ordinary...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 215–238.
Published: 01 June 2002
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 193–218.
Published: 01 June 2003
... (127) 207 Shannon McRae Eliot, however, directs the reader’s attention to her carnal physicality, gazing contemptously as she “slips softly to her needful stool.” Her sole intel­ lectual activity during this task consists of vicariously experiencing yet another rape: Clarissa in “the...