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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Teresa Heffernan Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 Apocalyptic Narratives: The Nation in Salman Rushdie’s Midnights Children Teresa Heffernan The radically performative laying down of the law by the legislator must create the very context...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 510–544.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Patrick Colm Hogan Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Midnight's Children: Kashmir and the Politics of Identity Patrick Colm Hogan M . Keith Booker has recently drawn attention to a common ten­ dency in the interpretive criticism of Salman Rushdie, and indeed of much...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
...John J. Su Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 ULI Epic of Failure: Disappointment as Utopian Fantasy in Midnight's Children John J. Su And so, by a strange and melancholy paradox, the moment of failure is the moment of value; the comprehending and experi­ encing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 345–370.
Published: 01 September 2007
...Min Hyoung Song Copyright © Hofstra University 2007 w The Children of 1965: Allegory, Postmodernism, and Jhumpa Lahiri’s T h e N am esake M in H young Song J h u m p a Lahiri was already a celebrated author w hen her first novel ap­ peared in print. H er short...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 528–535.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Joseph Jonghyun Jeon The Children of 1965: On Writing, and Not Writing, as an Asian American , by Song Min Hyoung , Duke University Press , 2013 . 284 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2013 Joseph Jonghyun Jeon The Children of 1965: On Writing, and Not Writing, as an Asian...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 429–447.
Published: 01 December 2016
...Eleanor Reeds This essay reads the hidden histories of the First World War and the Algerian War of Independence in Pat Barker’s Regeneration and Assia Djebar’s Children of the New World , focusing on their representation of a feminized resistance to war that takes silence as its most powerful...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 June 2017
... possibilities. The particular words Addie repudiates—words like “motherhood” and “sin”—attest to the connection between her philosophical views and her deepest lived frustrations. In turn, Addie’s linguistic philosophy informs those of her children—particularly Dewey Dell, Darl, and Vardaman—all of whom feel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Emily James This essay explores the inkblot as a modernist motif, from gothic children’s rhymes to the unlikely source material for Hermann Rorschach’s psychoanalytic measures. In the work of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, the ephemeral trappings of pen and ink give rise to wayward, even...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 264–271.
Published: 01 June 2011
... sundry reasons to enlist; children were encouraged to hate the enemy and love war, thus predisposing them to become cannon fodder in some future conflict; young women were morally coerced into joining the Red Cross or performing other useful wartime work, while housewives were 264Twentieth...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 238–266.
Published: 01 June 2012
...” aesthetics with her comments on the lack of “act[s] of understanding and sympathy” in Uncle Tom’s Children (“Uncle Tom” 3). In addition to critiqu- ing each other’s positions through reading the other as hyper-feminized or hyper-masculinized, each critiqued the other for improper use of dia- lect...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 164–173.
Published: 01 March 2013
... neglected for far too long. In “The Poetry Picture Book: Stevie Smith and Children’s Culture,” Bryant argues that we should consider Smith’s incantatory nursery-rhyme-like verse and accompany- ing illustrations within the context of her numerous reviews of children’s books and, more broadly, the rise...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 431–443.
Published: 01 December 2001
... and scope of literature, its responsibility and freedom. But it would be unfair to suggest that Rushdie’s significance as a writer is entirely indebted to the accident of the fatwa.The appearance of Midnight’s Children in 1981 was a remarkable event in its own right. For many...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 175–198.
Published: 01 June 2006
... is an outcome of the destructive impulses of the subject” (Psycho-Analysis of Children [PC] 197) and that “the superego becomes something which bites, devours, and cuts” (Love, Guilt, and Reparation [LGR] 187).The un­ nerving implication of Klein’s theory is that the superego, far from being...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 110–117.
Published: 01 March 2016
... Fireside Poets, for example) and eliding others entirely (the poetic traditions of minority or immigrant groups; children’s poetry; light verse). The Cambridge History does neither. The result is a physically imposing 50-chapter book, consisting of more than 1300 densely packed pages and weighing almost...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 367–390.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., it is implied by the repeated insistence that only the youngest o f the children crossed to the far side of the lake (“some of us, the youngest, / got up and went to the other side of the lake” [41-42]; “some of us, / the youngest, would go away that afternoon / and never...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 231–239.
Published: 01 June 2016
... object of care (37). The following two chapters, entitled “Linguistic Impairment and the Default of Modernism: Totality and Otherness: Dys-/Disarticulate Modernity” and “Post-Modern Wild Children, Falling Towers, and the Counter-Linguistic Turn,” consider how an exit from the systemic and pervasive...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... 47.3 (2001): 374-390 Hannum, Howard LScared sick looking at it’:A Reading of Nick Adams in the Published Stories.” 47.1 (2001): 92—113 Hays,Tony. See Durham Heaney, Seamus. See Boly Heffernan,Teresa. “Apocalyptic Narratives: The Nation in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 355–364.
Published: 01 June 2012
... to fictional world-making. Turning to Rushdie, Trousdale pays minute attention to “the incom- pleteness of Indian cosmopolitanism” (91) and the dire consequences of such an imperfect vision. Her first chapter on Rushdie, titled “Cosmo- politanism and the Shiv Sena in Midnight’s Children and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 336–366.
Published: 01 September 2014
... narcissist in tidy contrast to a putatively selfless parent or is understood merely as a visible reflection of a parent’s virtues, Smith explodes the self-serving fictions—demonizing and idealizing alike—into which adults write children. She undertakes this by mocking the poses of humility and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 494–519.
Published: 01 December 2003
... twenty-first century feminism.1 Women writers, concerned with the particular difficulties of creating literature while bearing and raising children, have contributed significandy to this con­ versation. In the twentieth century, most American women writers em­ phasize the desperate...