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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2000
...Catherine Gunther Kodat Copyright © Hofstra University 2000 To “Flash White Light from Ebony”: The Problem of Modernism in Jean Toomer’s Cane Catherine Gunther Kodat The mirror stage is a drama whose internal thrust is precipitated from...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 145–174.
Published: 01 June 2009
...Paul Stasi © 2015 by Hofstra University 2009 Passing and Primitivism in Toomer’s Cane A “Synchronous but More Subtle Migration”: Passing and Primitivism in Toomer’s Cane Paul Stasi In part 1 of Cane we encounter a poem that has seemed to many of its readers to articulate the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): vi–vii.
Published: 01 June 2009
...Cary Nelson © 2015 by Hofstra University 2009 Twentieth-Century Literature’s Andrew J. Kappel Prize in Literary Criticism, 2009 The winner of this year’s prize is Paul Stasi’s “A ‘Synchronous but More Subtle Migration’: Passing and Primitivism in Toomer’s Cane.” The judge is Cary...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 157–163.
Published: 01 March 2013
... approximately six years studying with Georges Gurdjieff in France, joining Gurdjieff’s compound in 1924, just a year after Cane was published (86). Toomer described Gurdjieff’s methods as a “complete system, a way of life to which I could dedicate body, mind, and soul” (91). Vetter details one of the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 401–408.
Published: 01 September 2009
... hybridity, modernity and modernism. For example, during an extended close reading of Jean Toomer’s Cane, Sollors argues that the text consciously eschews stable generic categorization, resisting a nostalgic wish for a return to traditional country values . . . [Go- ing] on, and going on...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... (2003) 12—31 Kodat, Catherine Gunther. “To ‘Flash White Light from Ebony’:The Problem of Modernism in Jean Toomer’s Cane.” 46.1 (2000): 1-19 Kot, Paula. “Speculation,Tourism, and The Professor’s House. ” 48.4 (2002): 393-426 Lewis, Wyndham. See Reynolds; Stanfield Literary theory...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 504–512.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Harlem Renaissance,” offers a reading of Jean Toomer’s Cane and Langston Hughes’s The Weary Blues and Fine Clothes to the Jew, as well as the Harlem Renaissance more generally. Graham deftly avoids the sort of reductive reading that simply states the importance of music to the Harlem Renaissance...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 46–81.
Published: 01 March 2003
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 March 2017
... devotion that saturates Robinson Crusoe’s account of his life and times on and off the island: “If Providence were to watch over us,” said Cruso, “who would be left to pick the cotton and cut the sugar-cane? For the business of the world to prosper, Providence must sometimes wake and sometimes sleep, as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 197–216.
Published: 01 June 2001
... Wake. For instance, he imagines waiting for Joyce “as if he / bloomed there every dusk with eye-patch and tilted hat / rakish cane on one shoulder” and describes the Irish Troubles as “still splitting heirs, dividing a Shem from a Shaun” (199). He also praises Joyce...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 1–31.
Published: 01 March 2015
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 214–237.
Published: 01 June 2000
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 285–310.
Published: 01 September 2000
.... When Rice recollects his first meeting with the presurgery Molly, he remarks on “her calm and her independence; the confident way she shook [his] hand and found a seat for herself with her white cane. And when she spoke of her disability,” he tells us, “there was no self-pity, no hint of resig­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 241–267.
Published: 01 June 2001
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 264–291.
Published: 01 September 2002
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 217–246.
Published: 01 June 2008
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 273–306.
Published: 01 September 2008
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 287–321.
Published: 01 September 2009
... male femininity carries an oblique political charge. Appreciating their Wildean dress—soft felt hat, scarlet lips, silver cane, long fingernails—Barnes foregrounds their beauty, frivolity, and aesthetic richness, which contrast sharply with the rest of New York. In the era of the City Practical...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 283–308.
Published: 01 June 2013
... museum visitor “leaves his naiveté outside along with his cane and his umbrella” (185) he surely knew that the relinquished umbrella had functioned as a symbol of codified behavior in cultural institutions for decades. In his 1858 essay, “Please to Leave Your Umbrella,” Charles Dickens...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 317–346.
Published: 01 September 2018
....” After trading symbolic strokes with a cane, the two retire to a restaurant, get drunk, and “[part] with protestations of eternal friendship” (121). Honor, Woolf suggests, is only a matter of surface formality. The other members of the ring have similarly disheartening experiences, coming to the...