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cancer

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2003) 49 (1): 103–122.
Published: 01 March 2003
... missed the full implications, for both authors, of what may look like a mere passing reference to Cendrars’s novel Moravagine in Miller’s Tropic of Cancer, written before the two writers met. Likely a rec­ ommendation to read Moravagine came from the eccentric and ubiqui­ tous bohemian Comad...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2010) 56 (2): 168–195.
Published: 01 June 2010
... of Iron further fueled enduring criti- cal discussions of ethics and complicity in J. M. Coetzee’s work. Written as a sustained letter from Elizabeth Curren, a former classics professor who is dying of cancer, to her expatriated daughter, Age of Iron directly addresses one of the governing concerns...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (3): 441–464.
Published: 01 September 2013
... year history of Clare, Inc., a fictional Ameri- can corporation, and the story of the final few months in the life of Laura Bodey, a Lacewood, Illinois woman stricken with ovarian cancer, probably due to exposure from the local Clare chemical plant. Interspersed between the two narratives...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (3): 346–368.
Published: 01 September 2000
..., Styron wrote an editorial for the New York Times arguing that “the pain of severe depression is quite un­ imaginable to those who have not suffered it” and “to the tragic legion who are compelled to destroy themselves there should be no more reproof at­ tached than to the victims of terminal cancer...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2018) 64 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... .” Rat Subterranean News , April 17 : 6 . Miller Henry . 1961a . Tropic of Cancer . New York : Grove . Miller Henry . 1961b . Tropic of Capricorn . New York : Grove . Miller Henry . 1964 . “ Obscenity and the Law of Reflection .” In Henry Miller on Writing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (3): 520–527.
Published: 01 September 2013
...). Glass demonstrates how Grove effectively tapped into Paris’s literary output, most notably with authors such as Samuel Beckett, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Jean Genet, and Henry Miller, who origi- 521 Abram Foley nally published Tropic of Cancer with the Paris-based Olympia Press. Grove drew...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (2): 217–240.
Published: 01 June 2001
... concluding that because the book “does have some redeeming social importance” it is not obscene and Ferlinghetti was not guilty (Ferlinghetti 127). Henry Miller was also the target of censorship in Massachusetts, for Tropic of Cancer. Even though Massachusetts has a long history of book...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2021) 67 (2): 109–138.
Published: 01 June 2021
... ‘the ranch’ by removing unwanted vegetation [and] taming the wild, assisting in the eradication of the ‘Indian’ and the ‘Indian country’” ( Waugh 2010 : 9). As is well known, the defoliant used in these missions, Agent Orange, continues to cause birth defects and cancer and contaminate Vietnam’s soil...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2003) 49 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 2003
... teases out the implications of a seemingly incidental reference to Cen- drars’s novel Moravagine in Tropic of Cancer, written before the authors phys­ ically met. Their more important literary meetings seem to take place in a fluid, unstable place, where biography bleeds into fiction and all bound­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 405–433.
Published: 01 December 2000
... the rhetoric of plague as opposed to the rhetoric of such “individualizing” diseases as TB and cancer, analyzed by Susan Sontag in Illness as Metaphor. Sontag points out that “in the images that collected around the disease [TB] one can see emerging a modern idea of individuality (35...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2003) 49 (1): 46–81.
Published: 01 March 2003
... of breast cancer, through the height of the war in France. Leblanc made “prodigious ef­ forts to ‘die consciously’—to watch the core of her being through death” (Webb 466).17 Anderson’s next partner, Dorothy Caruso, also died of breast cancer, and again Anderson rose to the challenge of nursing her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2004) 50 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 March 2004
... its gnostic elements, engages with the ineluctably material “narrative of entry-permits and passports”: like a variety of modernist works—rang­ ing from Wyndham Lewis’s Tan to Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises to Stein’s Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas to Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2009) 55 (2): 262–268.
Published: 01 June 2009
... and cancer act as props for the protagonist and narrator Pedro’s masochistic fantasies is highly rewarding and insightful. Nevertheless, these insights struggle against Mooney’s persistent habit of paratactic enumeration. Here is one example of many: These fantasy transformations involving...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (2): 351–359.
Published: 01 June 2013
... reenactment of Septi- mus’s choice to die validates it and grants it worth” (99). But Fisher does not explain why Woolf would depict influenza rather than tuberculosis or cancer, say, as provocative in the ways that Fisher describes. Also, Fisher may miss an opportunity in not commenting directly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2014) 60 (4): 455–480.
Published: 01 December 2014
... from ovarian or cervical cancer, a tumorous contamination of the reproductive organs that inverts the deviant reproductive capacity of the office’s clients. This portrait of Oakland’s welfare mothers exemplifies the grotesque satire that, as Michael Hames-García notes (71), runs throughout...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2005) 51 (2): 210–243.
Published: 01 June 2005
... innocent Annabel, and that the nymphean evil breathing through every pore of the fey child that I had prepared for my secret delectation, would make the secrecy impossible, and the delectation lethal. (124-25) Humbert s depiction of the trip as a cancerous “growth” reflects...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2007) 53 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2007
... elegies” (Ramazani 22) — “Death from Cancer” and “Mary Winslow”— and a poem on dying, “Where the Rainbow Ends.” She then reads four poems in which Lowell reflects on his struggles with mental illness, poems with recurring figures of psychic death and resurrection: “Waking in the Blue,” “Home after...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2017) 63 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 March 2017
... in an apartheid system as she dies of cancer; in The Master of Petersburg the fictional Dostoevsky, grieving over the death of his stepson, struggles with an ethical obligation to “answer to what he does not expect” ( Coetzee 1994 , 80); in Disgrace David Lurie seeks forgiveness from the father of Melanie...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2019) 65 (1-2): 97–120.
Published: 01 March 2019
... and the nurturer of nine children, ends up insane in the mountains of Bosnia. Sasha senses that she cannot meet her mother’s expectations and that she is about to lose her to cancer. After Sasha attacks a doctor, she is sent to live with her father. When she sees how her stepbrother enjoys the kind of fatherly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2019) 65 (1-2): 121–144.
Published: 01 March 2019
... in Brighton Beach in the early 1990s. One member of the family, “Uncle Pasha,” a poet, has stayed behind in the old country. Although he visits his relatives in 1993 and 1994, when his mother has fallen ill with cancer, he cannot be persuaded to relocate to America. While the first half of the novel relates...