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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 125–149.
Published: 01 June 2000
...Sarah Henstra Copyright © Hofstra University 2000 Looking the Part: Performative Narration in Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood and Katherine Mansfield’s “Je Ne Parle Pas Français” Sa r a h H e n s t r a n the early part of the twentieth century...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 175–208.
Published: 01 June 2009
...Eric Berlatsky © 2015 by Hofstra University 2009 Julian Barnes’s Flaubert’s Parrot and Sexual “Perversion” “Madame Bovary, c’est moi Julian Barnes’s Flaubert’s Parrot and Sexual “Perversion” Eric Berlatsky Published first in England in 1984, Julian Barnes’s Flaubert’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 287–321.
Published: 01 September 2009
...Thomas Heise © 2015 by Hofstra University 2009 Degenerate Sex and the City: Djuna Barnes’s Urban Underworld Degenerate Sex and the City: Djuna Barnes’s Urban Underworld Thomas Heise In a remarkable but largely overlooked 1918 interview with New York City Police Commissioner...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 391–412.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Merrill Cole Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 Backwards Ventriloquy: The Historical Uncanny in Barnes’s Nightwood Merrill Cole N ot those who had seen him last, but me who had seen him best, as if my memory of him were himself; and because you forget...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 251–258.
Published: 01 June 2014
.... Although the political goals of Spiro’s writers (Virginia Woolf, Djuna Barnes, and Christopher Isherwood) in the 1930s are distinct from Brown’s West Indian writers (Edgar Mittleholzer, George Lamming, Sam Selvon, and Roger Mais) in the 1950s, both Spiro and Brown effectively suggest that difficult...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 333–340.
Published: 01 June 2012
...” (104). Seitler contends that Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood (1937) should be read in a 334 Review similar vein, focusing on Robin’s perversion and “decline to a lower order of humanity” (116), and she herself reads all the characters in Barnes’s text as “sexual subjects in a state of bestial...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 259–266.
Published: 01 June 2014
..., Blyn examines some of Djuna Barnes’s earlier work and there finds Barnes wrestling with two of the convictions her own book is determined to challenge. Barnes between 1913 and 1919 wrote and illustrated a series of articles on the decline of Chinatown, Greenwich Village, and Coney Island. In...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 359–364.
Published: 01 September 2017
... engagement with tradition, mortality, and memory. “The Erotics of Mortal Obligation,” chapter 3, pays welcome attention to the undersung connection between Djuna Barnes and T. S. Eliot, dwelling on how Nightwood rejects The Waste Land ’s attempted repatriation of the dead. Barnes’s novel is handled...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 72–91.
Published: 01 March 2001
...). The following suggests that Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises is much more narrator Jake Barnes’s memory o f war than has been recognized, in terms of landscape, imagery, allusions, and a recurring story of wounding. In this complex, poetic novel, war and wounding constitute a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
...): 421-448 Bailey, Quentin. “Heroes and Homosexuals: Education and Empire in E. M. Forster.” 48.3 (2002): 324-347 Baker, James R. “Golding and Huxley:The Fables of Demonic Possession.” 46.3 (2000): 311-327 Barnes, Djuna. See Henstra Barth, John. See Worthington Beckett, Samuel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 228–236.
Published: 01 June 2017
... the claim about Venice in The Waste Land . The “Afterword: Barnes and Beckett, Petropi of the Twilight” points forward briefly and highly selectively from 1922 toward the further development of a post-World War I decadent sensibility in middle and late modernism. The mechanical aesthetics of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 524–531.
Published: 01 September 2012
... line of Jonathan Greenberg’s chapter “Laughter and Fear in A Handful of Dust” is one of my favorites: “In Evelyn Waugh’s universe, life is nasty, British, and short” (70). Of course anyone writing about Waugh, Stella Gibbons, Nathanael West, Djuna Barnes or the other modernist sati- rists whom...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 215–238.
Published: 01 June 2002
... terion and as an independent cultural critic, his championing of eccen­ tric novelists such as Djuna Barnes (whose use of religious rhetoric we shall further explore), David Jones, and George Barker (both Catholic converts) while he was an editor at Faber places him awkwardly between the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 192–206.
Published: 01 June 2004
... Carey, Ian McEwan, Joanna Trollope, Jane Smiley, Don DeLillo, Julian Barnes, and Jeanette Winterson. In all, Hogarth registered the names of 132 authors.2 In an interview with the Independent on 14 March, Hogarth claimed he was intending to sell the names back to the writers for a one-time...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 231–239.
Published: 01 June 2016
... burgeoning sexuality, banished and Benjy’s radical otherness annulled by the omniscient narration of part IV. Berger then reads Robin from Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood in relation to Stevie and Benjy, a pairing he admits is not particularly convincing given that these latter characters clearly suffer from...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 269–276.
Published: 01 June 2010
... Critical canonizers of modernism nor the radical protest fiction embraced by recent critics represents the literature that most Americans actually read at the time. The standard histories give us either Faulkner and Djuna Barnes or Steinbeck and James Farrell, but not Pearl Buck or John O’Hara...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 347–351.
Published: 01 September 2006
... but is, rather, queer. Hemingway’s startling scenes of amputee sex in To Have and Have Not (“Go ahead. Go ahead now. Put the stump there. Hold it there. Hold it. Hold it now. Hold it the enema in A Farewell to Arms, Barnes’s war wound in The Sun Also Rises, and the fascinating antics in The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 349–354.
Published: 01 June 2012
... Our Time (1925) and in The Sun Also Rises (1926), the novel that marked Hemingway’s first commercial success and that many readers believe to be his supreme achievement. In one of the most touching scenes in that novel, Jake Barnes says to Lady Ashley, simply and truly, “Oh, Brett, I love...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 115–127.
Published: 01 March 2008
... Pound, Lewis, Eliot, and the broader cast of Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, and even Lewis Carroll—saw themselves as resisting commercialism all the while they were modeling the social organizations and outlooks that commercialism demanded. However, Cooper does not want to cast the modernists as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 82–102.
Published: 01 March 2003
... Mystery of Paris, Engel’s novel is in fact a novel about Ernest Hemingway or, more accurately, two novels about Hem­ ingway, since Wad appears in Murder in Montparnasse both as the Hem­ ingway who is working on his “Spanish novel” and as the Hemingway [Jake Barnes] who is drinking his way through...