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awaken

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 396–404.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Elinor Fuchs Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 The Apocalyptic Ibsen: When We Dead Awaken E l in o r Fu c h s And four great beasts came up from the sea The second, like a bear. It was raised up on one side, and had three ribs in its...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2004) 50 (1): 88–105.
Published: 01 March 2004
... seen too much and so bites his tongue, bides his time. One who recovered from scarlet fever, and ever since understands the animals’ lan­ guage. One who cultivates plants with sword-shaped leaves and plots rebellions. One who experiences the “joy-on-awakening” that field...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 453–469.
Published: 01 December 2000
... this is from the start im­ possible. We have seen, moreover, that vagrants, victims, and murderers momentarily or permanently exist outside of time. Dyer and Hawksmoor themselves experience the disorientation upon awakening that is fairly com­ mon but in this book is loaded with painful...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Fowles.John. See Lynch Friel, Brian. See Moloney Fuchs, Elinor. “The Apocalyptic Ibsen: When We Dead Awaken." 46.4 (2000): 396-404 CjXenter, Robert. “Toward a Theory of Rhetoric: Ralph Ellison, Kenneth Burke, and the Problem of Modernism.” 48.2 (2002): 191-214 Gersder, Amy. See Axelrod...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 688–693.
Published: 01 December 2012
... that motivates her study, from Kate Chopin’s The Awakening through Willa Cather’s Song of the Lark or any number of New Woman novels from both sides of the Atlantic. Working against sexological theories like Havelock Ellis’s that positioned woman as the “race type” and man as the variation...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 520–546.
Published: 01 December 2003
... relation between the upper and lower classes: “What’s dem slobs in the foist cabin got to do wit us?” (125). Later in scene 1, the Irishman Paddy attempts to awaken Yank to another essential feature of modern working-class life—alienation from contact with a natural environment as a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 377–398.
Published: 01 September 2012
... familiarity of other people whom she presumes to understand pathologically, as diseases, symptoms and disabilities, that she is deeply affected by this newfound mysteriousness.12 Enid’s awakening to the unknown expands to involve the entire setting, the sudden strangeness of the world expressed in nar...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 472–491.
Published: 01 December 2011
... of a political awakening, will speak directly to both our understanding of postmodernism then, and the possibility of imagining something like an after-postmodernism now. Within the context of contemporary literary criticism, to be sure, a similar effort to define our present cultural...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 475–498.
Published: 01 December 2017
... “lead[ing] us toward” a “bare, blind contact with the other” (1996, 114). Such a troubled affective sense of contact permits Levinas’s own complicated sense of ethical understanding, that understanding where, as he puts it, “there is both relation and rupture, and thus awakening of the self by the Other...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 287–304.
Published: 01 September 2015
... slumber. So long as it remains human, among men, ethics remains dogmatic, narcissistic, and not yet thinking…. The ‘unrecognizable’ is the awakening. It is what awakens, the very experience of being awake” (2009, 108). Here Derrida resists the simple incorporation of animals into a human moral code. It is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 23–39.
Published: 01 March 2007
... death of his wife, whom he has “betrayed” through his vi­ carious possession of Helen, Major Plunkett has an ethical awakening of sorts and decides to abandon his history of St. Lucia. From then on, he sees in Helen “not a cause or a cloud, only a name for a local wonder” (309).The result...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 54–69.
Published: 01 March 2011
... awakening the countervoices in oneself and embarking upon speech with them. ––J. M. Coetzee (Doubling the Point 65) Questions, concepts, ideas: all these must be given a home, a com- munity, before they begin to make sense. “History,” writes the novelist in J. M...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 119–144.
Published: 01 June 2016
... poisoned. For Animal, being “here” means awakening to a “nother world” not “meant to be seen” by the “world of humans” but nevertheless characterized by a sense of community that includes nonhuman entities. Animal explains, “Since I was small I could hear people’s thoughts even when their lips were...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 94–101.
Published: 01 March 2017
... questions weakens the book. The text fails to enter the world of diversity, to awaken from the dream of whiteness. Gelpi writes that he regrets leaving out Langston Hughes and Nathaniel Mackey. Why didn’t he include them then? His defense quoted above is basically an evasion. In the chapter called “The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... Ttions of the just-completed century. Elinor Fuchs shows how Henrik Ibsen’s final play, When We Dead Awaken, portrays a characteristically modern ten­ sion between ironic scrutiny and apocalyptic dread and desire, serving “as a prologue to the twentieth century’s proliferation of apocalyptic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 207–238.
Published: 01 September 2004
... neously a moment of moral awakening and its frustration. Ethical conduct depends on the duality arising from a practical, principled confrontation between oneself and another person for whom one is responsible or to whom one is answerable. Each example discloses personal responsibil­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 414–420.
Published: 01 September 2007
... conventional naturalistic surface plot and a mythic and spiritual subplot. The biographical point is less significant than Daum er s description o f the wom en characters as complex archetypes o f goddesses, Fates, and Furies who awaken “religious fear” (249) and redeem, often with...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 575–581.
Published: 01 December 2010
... academy since feminist literary criticism awakened interest in it in the 1980s. Since that time, its virtues have been held in tension, just barely, with its political defects. Lauren Berlant’s recent book, The Female Com- plaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture (Duke...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 532–539.
Published: 01 September 2012
..., Phil- lips awakens readers to the centrality of ordinary living in the work of important twentieth-century poetry. Whereas Olson draws on the concepts of Henri Lefebvre to situate the work of Stein, Joyce, Proust, and Stevens in various social, historical and personal contexts, however...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 720–727.
Published: 01 December 2012
... their audiences by awakening them to how far in their day-to-day lives they had strayed from God’s desires and so shaking them free of habitual behaviors. Similarly, in the 1961 novel The Moviegoer, Walker Percy’s Binx Bolling is still lamenting our inability to transcend “the everydayness” of...