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abortion

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 663–687.
Published: 01 December 2012
...Meg Gillette Copyright © Hofstra University 2012 Modern Abortion Narratives and the Century of Silence Modern American Abortion Narratives and the Century of Silence Meg Gillette “I finally found a doctor in West New York, New Jersey. The doctor was very sweet. He had...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 239–266.
Published: 01 September 2017
... cognates: blind alleys, cul de sacs , futility of any variety); reproduction (embryos, rebirth, ripeness, but especially forms of reproductive failure—impotence, sterility, stillbirth, abortion); and what can be termed public feeling—in this case, a sense of urgency and epochal confusion combined with a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 251–258.
Published: 01 June 2014
... and domesticity, but this episode is imme- diately followed by her traumatic abortion (116), an event which strips away Sally’s usual artifice as she sadly mentions later that she might have liked to have had the child, after all. Ultimately Sally, like Mrs. Manresa, is shown to be...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 545–554.
Published: 01 December 2014
... System, like the Yippie Manifesto, generally projected a nation of “peace (of course) along with universal health care, access to birth control and abortion, renovated urban housing suitable for communal living” (69), and so on. But, of course, accomplishing these things would require an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 559–566.
Published: 01 December 2010
... omitted elements are not the most popular examples—Peduzzi’s suicide from “Out of Season,” the war from “Big Two-Hearted River,” the word abortion from “Hills Like White Elephants”—but rather the subjective feelings of Hemingway’s narrators and characters. In a second pivotal chapter, “Who Sees...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 150–170.
Published: 01 June 2000
... that the object of the address can exist only “as a product of poetic intervention” (146). As Johnson argues in her study of the relation between “apostrophe, animation, and abortion,” uses of apostrophe exist within a continuum, with a celebration of the poet’s capacity to bestow presence...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 60–89.
Published: 01 March 2012
... flee when they want to escape the scorn of North Dormer. That Charity celebrates her budding passion for Harney in Nettleton’s doubtful moral atmosphere, symbolized by the presence of Julia Hawes, an abortion clinic run by a Dr. Merkle, and the town’s retail shops, underscores the social...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 355–373.
Published: 01 September 2001
... someone to help her abort her baby, and that she hopes claiming to have been raped will inspire the Convent women to help. 4. Obviously, the Convent in Paradise is a site for female reconstitution, both spiritual and communal. Despite radical isolation and occasional infighting, Mavis, Gigi...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 345–370.
Published: 01 September 2007
... is its object o f venera­ tion, is the fantasmatic beneficiary of every political intervention. Even proponents o f abortion rights, while promoting the freedom o f women to control their own bodies through reproductive choice, recurrently frame their political...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 193–218.
Published: 01 June 2003
... band refuses her sexually, marks a failed metamorphosis. This failure leads to an all-too-prosaic discussion of the debilitating effects of childbirth and abortion. Philomela’s missing tongue becomes Lil’s missing teeth, speech this time merely interrupted by the impatient bartender rather...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 248–272.
Published: 01 September 2007
... that have defined her life: “Abort. Retry. Ignore. F ail.. The shallow theatricality o f Em i’s death could not be more postmodern. But her unsentimental elimination also suggests that she is no longer useful, that the future belongs instead to characters like Gabriel or the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 305–329.
Published: 01 September 2015
... steps back into the darkness, united and happy.” It’s also why Forster pulls the rug out from under them as their amateur enthusiasm turns the incident into an adventure and finally a muddle: “The incident was a great relief to them both. They forgot their abortive personal relationship, and felt...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 92–117.
Published: 01 March 2015
... the sea,” “Mr. Joly … in the belfry,” “Piers pricking his oxen o’er the plain,” or “the farm of the Graves brothers,” do not form an integrated part of the life and world it presently inhabits: “but one more memory, one last memory, it may help, to abort again” (105, 107). These memory-scraps offer no...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 460–483.
Published: 01 December 2015
... abortive birth” in the last paragraph ( LS 303). Danielstown and two other houses burn as “the first wave of a silence that was to be ultimate flowed back confidently to the steps.” The “wave of a silence” replaces the wavelike materiality of the landscape; the geography of interwar politics has no place...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 June 2017
... her inability to procure an abortion, suggesting that she is en route to a constricting experience of motherhood that largely replicates Addie’s own. Dewey Dell’s first section of narration opens by calling attention to her alienation from her family members, none of whom help her to pick cotton: “Pa...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 34–55.
Published: 01 March 2000
... abortive utterances of the char­ acters, and particularly in the sterile rhetoric of the Dalloways, who epito­ 34 THE VOYAGE OUT mize the complacency of colonialism. Deconstruction of the paternal word is also manifest in tropes relating to sound. There...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 104–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
... loosely likened to Mary, then, both impregnated by their “fathers,” though the redemptive birth suggested by the parallel is aborted here: the baby dies, and there is no salvation. As for dandelions, since she “thought they were pretty,” Pecola wonders “Why . . . do people call them weeds?” (47...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 79–100.
Published: 01 March 2018
... shall come to naught. Wharton peppers her novels with more minor incidents that further corroborate this view: for example, Freddy Van Osburgh’s aborted entanglement with Norma Hatch in The House of Mirth (1905) and Owen Leath’s with Sophy Viner in The Reef . 2 Wharton often dramatizes the self...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 275–294.
Published: 01 September 2018
... statement were the necessary consequence of the preceding one. Notwithstanding Mutt’s (imagined) response that “ long as a woman got a hole, she can fuck ” (100) and her discovery (perhaps overdetermined in a novel of the 1970s) that during her subsequent, abortive marriage to Tadpole she experiences some...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 597–617.
Published: 01 December 2009
..., being a father is a rather abstract business” (63). This is borne out by his failure to understand why Lucy rejects the option of an abortion. Lucy meets her father’s incomprehen- sion with maternal instinct: “I am a woman, David. Do you think I hate children? Should I choose against the...