1-20 of 45 Search Results for

Soviet Union

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 145–166.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Ellen Litman Gary Shteyngart localism Russian Jewish American fiction transnationalism The Soviet Union is gone, and the borders are as free and passable as they’ve ever been. And yet, when a Russian moves between the two universes, this feeling of finality persists, the logical impossibility...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 121–144.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Union for Israel and North America. This first wave of emigration was followed by an even more massive post-Soviet Jewish exodus in the early 1990s, when more than 1.5 million people left for Israel, the United States, and Germany. As a result of this migration, the Odessa myth has become an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 43–70.
Published: 01 March 2019
... the former socialist Europe and the United States. Copyright © 2019 Hofstra University 2019 Eastern Europe immigrant literature postsocialism postsocialist memory Soviet Union transnational US literature It is becoming increasingly clear that new “critical contexts” ( Goldsworthy...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2019
... reserved. American studies Cold War Eastern/Central Europe immigration studies postsocialism Russian American literature Slavic studies Soviet Union US immigrant writing This special issue calls attention to an emergent body of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century cultural...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 97–120.
Published: 01 March 2019
...Tatjana Bijelić Although massive (post)socialist migration from Eastern Europe to the West is becoming increasingly represented in post-Soviet and post-Yugoslav writing, contemporary novels on women’s experiences of immigration have received scant attention, both in their host countries and in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... the unionization drive and feminist protest occupation of Grove in 1970. Copyright © 2018 Hofstra University 2018 Barney Rosset critical theory Henry Miller history of the book obscenity Between its founding in 1951 and its labor crisis in 1970, Grove Press stood at the epicenter of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 377–384.
Published: 01 June 2013
... Summer 2013 377 Damjana Mraović-O’Hare eight months after he landed. A Russian speaker who drew on his notes from a research trip to the former USSR, Kosinski wrote a book that not only “explained” the Soviet Union to Americans but also became “everything that an American propaganda...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 371–378.
Published: 01 September 2018
... debates about totalitarianism have tended to focus on Europe during World War II or to compare the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany in a manner that precludes discussion of the racial injustice stemming from democracy’s entanglement with colonialism and the slave trade. Race and the Totalitarian Century...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 674–680.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Lispector informed by her origins? Did she carry her provenance as part of her self-styling? Lispector did not go back to her birthplace; her reflections during her stay in Warsaw, where she went following her husband as she refused the Soviet Union’s invitation to visit, are telling. She thinks...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 350–357.
Published: 01 September 2016
.... The Most Advanced Literature .” In Soviet Writers’ Congress 1934: The Debate on Socialist Realism and Modernism in the Soviet Union , by Gorky Maxim , 15 – 24 . London : Lawrence and Wishart . ...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 120–127.
Published: 01 March 2018
... Fowles, and the “cerebral genre novels” of Paul Auster, Don DeLillo, Margaret Atwood, and Umberto Eco. The third threshold of postmodernism, the “interregnum” (65), occurs in 1989–90 with the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the incipient dissolution of the Soviet Union. Whether this phase marks a “late...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 138–145.
Published: 01 March 2015
... of essays,” “Comics and Media” provides insightful cases of interaction across forms of media at distinct points in history, ranging from film and dance at the apex of the Soviet Union to the digital era of today (8). Yuri Tsivian’s “Charlie Chaplin and His Shadows: On Laws of Fortuity in Art...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 71–96.
Published: 01 March 2019
.... One reason is the ongoing pull of Cold War epistemology in the entire socialist Eastern Bloc, irrespective of differences among individual countries—between, for example, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. This structure of feeling inhabits much of Novakovich’s work and provides a strong template for...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 540–545.
Published: 01 September 2012
... diminished after the breakup of the Soviet Union, but books arguing for the importance of a bombocentric perspective on post-war culture have appeared regularly since then: for example, Margot Henriksen’s 1997 Dr. Strangelove’s America and David Cordle’s 2006 States of Suspense. Nor is it surprising...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 111–119.
Published: 01 March 2018
... Faustian bargain between Western democracies and the tatters of Nazi Germany, whose surviving fascists then became uneasy allies in the struggle against the Soviet Union. Accordingly, his spy fiction offers “a dystopian warning that the sacrifices demanded by political ideology erase historical memory...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 23–42.
Published: 01 March 2019
... six months, national variations of political disintegration enveloped Hungary, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Bulgaria, and Romania. Two years later, in December 1991, the Soviet Union itself dissolved. By historical coincidence, November 9, 2014, was also the last day of the annual meeting of the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 277–285.
Published: 01 June 2010
... Cheever’s cultural history, is the primary uniformity-promulgating agent of the postwar period. After all, critics such as Macdonald claimed that “the mass man” was produced not by society but rather via the industrial destruction of society, by the Party in the Soviet Union and by the mass...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 241–267.
Published: 01 June 2001
... communism” (Paleface 178). Communism, in particu­ lar the Soviet Union, was another force, and perhaps the most frighten­ ing of all, in the campaign against the idea of individual consciousness. Lewis derived his sense of the Soviet Union partly from The Mind and Face of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... ecological cri­ sis, but corporate and government public relations seem to have success­ fully numbed public concern. Without the Cold War and the Soviet Union, there is no Evil Empire, no Antichrist, no immediate threat of annihilation. The terrible eruptions of bloody local conflicts do not seem...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 416–422.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Cold War” (3). This reception, he argues, was one in which the end of the Cold War was seen not only in parochial terms as the victory of the United States over the Soviet Union but also in more universal terms as the ultimate, definitive triumph of capitalism over socialism, of liberalism over...