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American self-determination

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 75–93.
Published: 01 March 2017
... that must grapple with an unattainable vision of the normal and with the crippling American myth of self-determination. Copyright © Hofstra University 2017 American self-determination cross-racial literary influence Ernest Hemingway homosexuality James Baldwin love triangle In the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 545–550.
Published: 01 December 2010
... towards “self-empowerment and re- birth” (5), as the most fundamental of American urges. But for Wilson this impulse has always been, and continues to be, essentially a religious one. The American drive towards self-creation, Wilson argues, is best under- stood through the Christian...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2005
... a “demythologizing decade” in which “the very nature of American things yielded and collapsed overnight” (“Great American Novel” 90). A self-described member of the “most propagandized generation”—a product of World War II rhetoric, Cold War containment, and mass media—Roth at that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 330–346.
Published: 01 September 2006
... except the love and respect of Don. AndTeach’s worldview, we learn earlier in the play, is that civilization is essentially held together by self-interest. In one of the most quoted passages from any of Mamet’s plays,Teach defines “free enterprise,” that lynchpin of American culture, as “The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 267–272.
Published: 01 June 2014
...Alex Miller American Fiction in Transition: Observer-Hero Narrative, the 1990s, and Postmodernism , by Kelly Adam , Bloomsbury Academic , 2013 . 147 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2014 Review Conceptualizing Change in Late Twentieth-Century American Fiction American...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 371–393.
Published: 01 September 2007
... announced the end o f the 1990s oc­ curred in September 2001. American optimism and faith in self-deter­ mination, in the ability to write one’s own destiny, was shaken by these 384 M iddlesex, History, and Contemporary American Fiction attacks, so unforeseen and close to hom e.13...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 94–101.
Published: 01 March 2017
...Steven Gould Axelrod American Poetry after Modernism: The Power of the Word , by Gelpi Albert . New York : Cambridge University Press , 2015 . 316 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2017 Albert Gelpi has now completed his critical trilogy on US poetry, a project nearly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 23–42.
Published: 01 March 2019
... several instances of professional Americanist self-discovery. Postwar Europe reminds Matthiessen of his experiences as Rhodes scholar in Oxford between 1923 and 1925, when, in a patriotic reaction to the avowedly anti-American attitude of his British peers, the young Matthiessen begins reading US authors...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 269–278.
Published: 01 June 2009
... Black: Choice, Desire, and the Black American Intellectual by Robert Reid-Pharr New York: New York University Press, 2007. 208 pages John C. Charles Robert Reid-Pharr’s Once You Go Black investigates what might seem to be a self-evident claim: that “the Black American has not only had a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 103–122.
Published: 01 March 2003
.... The epigraph announces a new, very American ideal, open­ ing fiction to the nonfictional self. In the place of a well-regulated pro­ 118 Blaise Cendrars and Henry Miller cession of events can be substituted the record of that voice which claims to be, or aspires to be, autobiographic. A mere...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 417–423.
Published: 01 September 2015
... Harlem Riot. “So We Went to Harlem” powerfully exemplifies how Henderson assumes the role of a griot who enacts the history of Harlem, appealing to black pride and self-determination through his poetic invocation of black music, and appealing nationally to the idea of Harlem as a black “home.” Like...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 516–538.
Published: 01 December 2011
... upwardly mobile self-made man with a downwardly mobile, other-made group, none of them considers the class with which it is most centrally concerned in relation to others. There is a quite noticeable absence of class conflict in these new American allegories, even though class and economy are...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 77–99.
Published: 01 March 2002
... claim that provided the pretense for Anglo-French air and naval forces to descend upon Egypt and “stabi­ lize” the region. 81 John P. McCombe One issue at the heart of this Anglo-American diplomatic crisis was the charge of American self-interest.5 The feeling among many in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 47–70.
Published: 01 March 2010
... American Sea Garden: Drowning the Idyll Threat to US Modernism “old country” on the other—makes for a modern Americanism that is both ungrounded and self-eroding. Defined by opposing sources of US national identity—up from the soil and down through the generations by blood—expatriate writers...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 663–687.
Published: 01 December 2012
...Meg Gillette Copyright © Hofstra University 2012 Modern Abortion Narratives and the Century of Silence Modern American Abortion Narratives and the Century of Silence Meg Gillette “I finally found a doctor in West New York, New Jersey. The doctor was very sweet. He had...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 472–491.
Published: 01 December 2011
... wider ensemble of global processes, if only because that situation is overtly determined by the flows of capital and culture between the center and periphery.3 476 Postmodernism, Indecision, and American Literary Globalism Which is to say, in the terms elaborated here, that any effort to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 346–368.
Published: 01 September 2000
... mirror—when a chimp will look behind the mirror for another chimp” (22). Remove the desire for self-knowledge with a dose of heavy sodium and all subsequent desires undergo significant revision.3 Describing the success of an initiative medicating a low-income, African American neighborhood of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 153–181.
Published: 01 June 2007
... 53.2 Summer 2007 153 Benjamin Schreier surreptitiously white) one, reinforcing the very formations whose gene­ alogy it purportedly seeks to unearth.Thus this essentially statist inquiry into American literature and culture presumes, as it is administered by, the self-evidence of “American...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 427–460.
Published: 01 December 2002
... parodically Christlike regard is for infantility, not infants. An addition near the conclusion of the typescript is Huxleys sec­ ond-best handwritten Americanization. Self-exiled to an abandoned light­ house, John Savage is fond of “hitting himself with a whip of knotted cords” until “trickles...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 126–156.
Published: 01 March 2013
... later in the novel, she has a new appreciation for the pace of American life. Despite the pain of her failed relationship with Helen, Adele, as Lutz puts it, “comes to reject the false advertising of neurasthenic self-presentation” (279). In part through overcoming the symptoms of Americanitis...