The juxtaposition of the two works under review isolates a spirited tension in the literary critical field. Although the two books survey roughly congruent sets of canonical, primarily British modernist authors, each tracks a starkly divergent legacy for literary modernism than the other—so much so, in fact, that each stands at a point almost exactly opposite the other within the present coordinates of modernist literary studies. One book seeks to recuperate the efforts of some modernist authors to resist having their works subsumed into the experience of their readers, while the other aims to demonstrate how some modernist authors created works that modeled heightened forms of receptivity for their readers. While one holds up the aesthetic autonomy guaranteed by formal narrative techniques meant to distance readers from texts, the other prizes the inclusiveness promised by formal narrative techniques meant to encourage attunement between texts and readers. Both books provide compelling...

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