The architectural theorist Charles Jencks asserts that, as art movements go, postmodernism (or “the Post-Modern,” in his rendering) has at fifty years in the making been considerably longer lived than modernist avant-garde movements such as vorticism, futurism, or surrealism. As an aesthetics, or even as a dominant cultural order, the postmodern has “become a transhistorical concept” (Jencks 2011, 8) like the baroque or romanticism. Jencks is not making a subtle distinction here between architectural history and cultural politics. In a field in which edifices rise and, then, after a period of time, may be demolished, a historical period will have its tombstone markers of birth and death: for example, Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1906 Larkin Administration Building in Buffalo, New York, the epitome of the modern(ist) office complex, was razed for a parking lot in 1950; and the implosion of the Pruitt-Igoe high-rise...

You do not currently have access to this content.