After decades of neglect, at best making cameo appearances in lists of “little-read writers of the 1930s” or as a star in “recovery scholarship,” Storm Jameson might well be on the cusp of a true revival. As part of Northwestern University Press’s series “Cultural Expressions of World War II,” the second major biography of this always engaging, never flawless, luminary of twentieth-century British letters and political activism may hopefully accelerate a growing wave of critical evaluation to match the historical interest.

Jameson was a vital part of world historical events of the 1930s and 1940s, working diligently through the interwar years in the peace movement and serving as a Sponsor in the Peace Pledge Union. In the years leading up to the Second World War, she began assisting political refugees from Germany and Eastern Europe, the most famous of these being Czesław Miłosz, who would...

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