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speaker

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Journal Article
TSQ (2016) 3 (3-4): 637–648.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., but the problems of representation they address are often quite simple, as we see in the first-person poem “Make Believe,” one of the soliloquies in Oliver Bendorf's award-winning collection, The Spectral Wilderness , in which speakers express trans identities. “Make Believe” begins, “The first time I took...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (4): 523–538.
Published: 01 November 2014
... a narrative about being trans—one's identity status is not “the story.” Biographical material may appear in the oblique form of references to gender ambiguity or transition, but the writing is framed in a way that separates the author from the “I” of the speaker. Second, work by all three poets exhibits...
Journal Article
TSQ (2016) 3 (3-4): 333–356.
Published: 01 November 2016
... us, which undermines the grandeur and authority of the singular? Medieval and early modern speakers, such as the seventeenth-century transgender memoirists discussed by Emily Rose in this issue, had no technocratic world-language system upon which to ground such concerns of linguistic propriety...
Journal Article
TSQ (2023) 10 (1): 90–91.
Published: 01 February 2023
... with the tools for thinking about how speakers can utilize the Spanish they are familiar with in strategic ways. While Martín is successful in her interdisciplinary approach, accessible writing, and connecting of language to our everyday, the author falls short when it comes to integrating transgender, nonbinary...
Journal Article
TSQ (2024) 11 (1): 80–96.
Published: 01 February 2024
... weighted alternative to “misnaming,” Turton ( 2021 : 43) reiterates this definition by asserting how the term “originated among certain trans speakers to denote the act of referring to a trans person by the (usually gender-specific) name assigned to them in infancy, in cases where they have rejected...
Journal Article
TSQ (2018) 5 (4): 574–588.
Published: 01 November 2018
... to the modern day. Chelsea Vowel, a Métis author from the Plains Cree–speaking community of Lac Ste. Anne, conducted an informal research project among Plains Cree speakers and found a number of words for people who do not easily fit within modern Western standards of gender and sexuality. Among those...
Journal Article
TSQ (2016) 3 (3-4): 569–577.
Published: 01 November 2016
... to. In short, I struggled to translate a book that even original-language speakers of Chinese find confusing. What to do? I couldn't go to Qiu herself for clarification; she was dead. Last Words from Montmartre , a book that chronicles the self-annihilating intentions of its elusive narrator, was the final...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (1-2): 123–125.
Published: 01 May 2014
... describe not only a crazy woman but also a gender-nonconforming homosexual man. While the noun loca is roughly analogous to terms like sissy or (flaming) queen , and Spanish speakers use it transnationally to describe particularly “effeminate” homosexual men, different regions also employ other...
Journal Article
TSQ (2020) 7 (3): 463–475.
Published: 01 August 2020
... ) and a research consultant on the film; and Professor Susan Stryker, who, like Lili Elbe, needs no introduction for this readership. What emerged in the exchange among the guest speakers and the audience was a more nuanced, complex, historically grounded understanding of the film. The following afternoon...
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Journal Article
TSQ (2015) 2 (3): 367–375.
Published: 01 August 2015
... speaker (representing her experience of being intersex) in a Smith College women's studies class considers the potential (and limitations) of this practice for advancing learning. Reflecting on the questionable value of presenting one intersex person's life experience as emblematic of anything, Malatino...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (1-2): 241–244.
Published: 01 May 2014
... alone, we constitute ourselves within grammar. To paraphrase Judith Butler, “I” still cannot speak “apart from the grammar that establishes my availability to you” ( 1999 : xxiv; see also Stone 1991 ). Grammar signs gender as well as race, age, dis/ability, social status. The speaker is never...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (1-2): 187–190.
Published: 01 May 2014
... University organized a conference on body modification. The aim of the event was to articulate the diverse ways in which all bodies — not simply those that are tattooed or those that have undergone some sort of transformative surgical procedure — are always already modified. One of the keynote speakers...
Journal Article
TSQ (2022) 9 (3): 443–459.
Published: 01 August 2022
... dogma requiring their critique. That these speakers do so from an anti-religion stance that is itself dogmatic is, for students of religious studies, less surprising than it might be for those new to understanding religion as a socially constructed classification. Freethought criticizes and thus seeks...
Journal Article
TSQ (2015) 2 (3): 376–394.
Published: 01 August 2015
.... 2 Shavonne: Uh, Anna, you're a girl, 3 get in the group! 4 (indistinguishable student talk) 5 Rex: Anna is trans. 6 (boys laugh) 7 Ms. G.: I can't hear her! Ms. Green's interruption, “We're listening to one mic” (line 1), told Shavonne that Lisa was the only sanctioned speaker...
Journal Article
TSQ (2018) 5 (1): 143–147.
Published: 01 February 2018
... studies association. We don't want a trans studies association that treats bodies as objects to study or ignore, or that reproduces the disproportionate status accruing to academically trained English-language speakers. We want a discipline that treats physical experience and understanding as central...
FIGURES
Journal Article
TSQ (2016) 3 (3-4): 524–544.
Published: 01 November 2016
... of colonial violence. That's just a joke. (90) Craving medical intimacy, feeling pleasure in objectification—all the love the poem expresses for doctors is both a joke and, as the italicized words splitting apart trauma intimate, no joke at all. The poem does not explicitly identify the speaker...
Journal Article
TSQ (2015) 2 (3): 447–463.
Published: 01 August 2015
... like kids and students don't denote any specific gender. For me, addressing the students as chicos felt more comfortable because it was not enforcing any binary. As a nonnative speaker, I wasn't fully aware of the feminine erasure that that perpetuates. However, I do have a problem with the idea...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (1-2): 245–248.
Published: 01 May 2014
..., amplified through microphone, computer, and speakers, can create a communicative intimacy that trespasses the presumed boundaries of the body and internal self. For Stone, communications technology and the gendered body itself are virtual “prostheses” that provide zones of active social interaction...
Journal Article
TSQ (2016) 3 (3-4): 376–387.
Published: 01 November 2016
... of a person is interwoven with verbal expression in a complicated way, and the spoken language is entirely permeated with deictic references to the gender of the speaker and addressee. Hence the gender of the subject is always utterly transparent in the language itself, whether written or spoken. A person who...
Journal Article
TSQ (2015) 2 (4): 720–724.
Published: 01 November 2015
..., the keynote speaker at the National Workshop, who, in her opening essay, challenges parents and schools to listen to the needs of children and “learn to live with gender ambiguity and not pressure our children with our own need for gender bedrock” (23). Ehrensaft, the author of the groundbreaking book Gender...