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privacy

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Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2015) 2 (4): 614–620.
Published: 01 November 2015
...Laura Peimer Abstract This article discusses how the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America has addressed issues related to privacy, access, and description with three of its trans* collections: The Ari Kane Papers, the International Foundation for Gender Education (IFGE) Records...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2018) 5 (4): 606–620.
Published: 01 November 2018
... from the 1930s where medical protocol was confounded by a black trans patient's refusal to cooperate, the author asks what the silence and unknowability produced around this person's life might do in the service of trans of color studies. Complicated by the fact that federal privacy regulations...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 February 2015) 2 (1): 175–178.
Published: 01 February 2015
... best job uncovering my sexuality and gender identity were time-consuming, were conducted orally in locations without privacy, and were used as a gateway to gain shelter or other resources designed to care for the most vulnerable. While some of these surveys make it possible for individuals engaging in...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2015) 2 (4): 544–552.
Published: 01 November 2015
... gets to decide? When there are gaps in particular areas, what strategies can we use to address those gaps? What are the privacy concerns that are specific to transgender materials, and how should archivists navigate those concerns? What interpretive frameworks would provide researchers with a richer...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2017) 4 (2): 317–321.
Published: 01 May 2017
... remains private, even if they have passed away? Does today's social and political context render their mid-twentieth-century desires for privacy irrelevant? If the desire for secrecy is rooted in shame, is revealing it then a form of liberation? How do concerns around privacy and confidentiality shift...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 February 2015) 2 (1): 179–184.
Published: 01 February 2015
..., who seem understandably to prefer their privacy and control of their public personas, resist categorization. In Najmabadi's generally readable prose, the bulk of the book (chaps. 2–6) shows the accumulated layers of discourse around nonheteronormativity. From the sediment of curiosity and...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2014) 1 (1-2): 57–59.
Published: 01 May 2014
...-nonconforming children and their families, trans adults must cope with the deeply different trajectories and life chances of the smallest gender outlaws. Some of these children may elect to be stealth (maintain total privacy about their gender histories) as adults; some may never identify openly as transgender...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2018) 5 (2): 228–244.
Published: 01 May 2018
... transition medically but not socially challenge conventions. Like all people who undergo gender-affirming surgery, they knowingly make themselves vulnerable to unwanted exposure. Though they may maintain privacy through most of their lives, they share with all transgender people the likelihood that there...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2015) 2 (4): 584–594.
Published: 01 November 2015
...) discrimination and readiness, (3) foreign militaries and transgender service, (4) institutional privacy accommodations, (5) organizational effectiveness and transgender inclusion, (6) physical standards and transgender service, (7) privacy in the US military, (8) transgender sports, (9) transgender medical...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2016) 3 (1-2): 104–119.
Published: 01 May 2016
... identity. They also recirculated social media memes from the earlier campaign, featuring national IDs with photos of male and female genitals instead of faces, to emphasize how the current ID system violates privacy. The Gender for All campaign steered clear of discussions of gender fluidity and...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 August 2015) 2 (3): 478–487.
Published: 01 August 2015
... ( Beemyn 2015 ). By not offering this option when it is readily available, colleges and universities violate the privacy of trans students; publicly out them, thereby exposing them to possible violence and harassment; and create a situation in which the institution will inadvertently discriminate against...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 August 2015) 2 (3): 464–468.
Published: 01 August 2015
... labor of trudging from bathroom to bathroom during a record-cold Michigan winter with new theoretical understandings of privacy, medicalization, and embodiment. Our reading of “Calling All Restroom Revolutionaries,” which includes an expansive checklist for assessing restroom accessibility at the...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2014) 1 (1-2): 68–73.
Published: 01 May 2014
..., respect, privacy, safety, and curriculum integration in educational settings free of bullying, harassment, and discrimination ( Toronto District School Board 2011 ). In addition, K-12 schools can support students with transgender family members through celebration of diversity of all kinds, staff training...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2017) 4 (3-4): 662–667.
Published: 01 November 2017
... nature of this conference attracted a much wider audience, including people not used to thinking in a clinical psychoanalytic framework as well as grappling with the issues of privacy and confidentiality involved therein. My concern is less with the danger of sharing confidential information about...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2015) 2 (4): 645–649.
Published: 01 November 2015
... invasion of privacy, emotional distress, and violation of her civil rights, setting an important precedent for trans and sex workers' rights ( Associated Press 1999 ). Her trans embodiment is central to her story, its affects, and her collection's place in this archives. Language has a limited capacity to...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2015) 2 (2): 330–335.
Published: 01 May 2015
... gender variance in real people (as opposed to mythological figures such as Hermaphroditus) has been presented from the point of view of the medical practitioner: as abnormalities, as “other.” Trans and intersex people have been regarded as “specimens,” with any move toward a greater respect for privacy...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2015) 2 (4): 621–634.
Published: 01 November 2015
... of these community founders and their desire for privacy. Such privacy, according to Michael C. Oliveira, project archivist at the ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives ( one.usc.edu ) at the University of Southern California, is “regulated by a patchwork of state and federal law” (pers. comm...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2017) 4 (3-4): 358–383.
Published: 01 November 2017
...” where “privacy and security from men's violence” is at stake (11). This power to exert control over women is attributed to the fantasy figure of unwoman, whose actions are characterized variously as homophobic, fetishistic, masochistic, voyeuristic, and criminal. Psychoanalytic theory contends that...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2014) 1 (4): 539–551.
Published: 01 November 2014
... patient privacy, many people see such cropping as a visible trace of medicine's reification and dehumanization of nonnormative bodies. Intersex activist Cheryl Chase specifically attacks the assumption that covering the eyes lends privacy to the subject of the photograph, asserting that “the only thing...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2016) 3 (1-2): 212–219.
Published: 01 May 2016
... presentation is supposed to euphemistically refer to, while norms of privacy shield them from public visibility. In very different ways, the presumptions, supposings, and demands associated with moral genitalia shape the worlds in which we all live, the vulnerabilities to which we are exposed, and...