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asterisk

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Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2014) 1 (1-2): 26–27.
Published: 01 May 2014
... fields; and some map the productive tensions between trans studies and other interdisciplines. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press 2014 The asterisk (*), or star, is a symbol with multiple meanings and applications that can mark a bullet point in a list, highlight or draw attention to a...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2015) 2 (4): 544–552.
Published: 01 November 2015
... trans* extensively in the call for papers, following the logic that Avery Brooks Tompkins explains in the first issue of TSQ : “In relation to transgender phenomena, the asterisk is used . . . to open up transgender or trans to a greater range of meanings” ( 2014 : 26). The use of the asterisk as...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2016) 3 (1-2): 228–234.
Published: 01 May 2016
... becoming-intersectional foregrounds process over positionality and takes place at a fundamental level—at the level of materiality, where the ways in which matter materializes resonate politically. My argument has three sections. I begin by discussing the addition of the asterisk to trans* in...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2017) 4 (2): 275–295.
Published: 01 May 2017
... ‘trans-,’ which remains open-ended and resists premature foreclosure by attachment to any single suffix” ( 2008 : 11), trans* is intended to be even more disruptive and to highlight its own dehiscence. And the asterisk is “starfishy,” a regenerative cut that pulls the body back through itself, moving...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2015) 2 (2): 195–208.
Published: 01 May 2015
... register through the conceptual operations signified by an asterisk. Trans* foregrounds and intensifies the prehensile, prefixial nature of trans- and implies a suffixial space of attachment that is simultaneously generalizable and abstract yet its function can be enacted only when taken up by...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2016) 3 (1-2): 175–184.
Published: 01 May 2016
... of her activist call. Her rhymes proselytize, engendering allies. One wonders the effect lyrics such as these have on listeners who do not see themselves as directly benefiting from the advancement of the LGBTQ cause. On the 2014 track “Frauen mit Sternchen” (“Women with Asterisks”; Sookee...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2015) 2 (2): 189–194.
Published: 01 May 2015
... void, or place of emergence. For them, trans* —with the asterisk holding a space for multiple attachments while visually symbolizing radiant, multipronged means and methods of entrainment—signifies a virtual potential immanent within processes of materialization. Trans* represents mattering's vital...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 February 2015) 2 (1): 136–147.
Published: 01 February 2015
... adaptation of web-based language taken up by the trans* community. The * (asterisk) is used as a wildcard in web searches by acting as a placeholder or a fill-in-the-blank symbol. This symbol or representation has been applied to gender identification to expand and include “folks who identify as transgender...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 August 2018) 5 (3): 298–310.
Published: 01 August 2018
... its rearview mirror can come into its focus? These remain worthy conversations for the future. 1. In recent years, the usage of trans* (with an asterisk) has provoked some controversy (Serano 2015 ), especially among some activists who object to what they see as the term's inaccessibility...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2017) 4 (3-4): 639–646.
Published: 01 November 2017
... methodology. While insights should certainly draw on embodied psycho-social experiences of people minoritized as trans*, the critical potential of trans* theorizing frequently exceeds the milieu in which it is often articulated. 13 It could be said that bringing the asterisk into trans*versality (as I wish...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2014) 1 (1-2): 107–110.
Published: 01 May 2014
... sex, or genderqueer. The term trans* should be understood as a political umbrella term that encompasses many different and culturally specific experiences of embodiment, identity, and expression. The asterisk aims to make its open-ended character explicit. 2. A translation of the law was...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2015) 2 (4): 578–583.
Published: 01 November 2015
... the asterisk. 2. The authors want to note that this first collection of trans existence excludes information in other languages spoken on the African continent. References Akanji Oladjide , and Epprecht Marc . 2013 . “ Human Rights Challenge in Africa: Sexual Minority Rights...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2016) 3 (3-4): 485–505.
Published: 01 November 2016
... increasingly common to encounter trans used with an asterisk to denote how “trans*” involves many different identities: “the asterisk stems from common computing usage wherein it represents a wildcard—any number of other characters attached to the original prefix” ( Ryan 2014 ). Correspondingly, Maria...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2016) 3 (3-4): 605–610.
Published: 01 November 2016
... across the limits of race, gender, body, and culture. The sensate cluster is structurally identical to the asterisk (*) that Eva Hayward and Jami Weinstein discuss as a grammatical strategy for representing the stickiness of trans* as “paratactic” ( 2015 : 198). In their introduction to the...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2016) 3 (3-4): 462–484.
Published: 01 November 2016
... tradução radical” (Transcreation is a practice of radical translation [ 1984 : 185]). For more on transcreación , see Ríos-Quimera 1981 . 9. An earlier version of the terms translatxrsation and translatxr made use of the asterisk to offer a productive means of thinking beyond static conceptions...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2015) 2 (2): 261–279.
Published: 01 May 2015
... transgender individuals but also agender, genderqueer, and other gender-nonconforming persons. See Sam Killermann's “What Does the Asterisk in Trans* Stand For?” ( 2012 ). 5. It is worth noting that Jackass and Wildboyz take up various other categories of abjected difference, including disability...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 August 2015) 2 (3): 469–476.
Published: 01 August 2015
... Affirming College Environments for Trans Youth .” Journal of LGBT Youth 10 , no. 3 : 208 – 23 . Stone Sandy . 1992 . “ The Empire Strikes Back: A Posttranssexual Manifesto .” Camera Obscura , no. 29 : 150 – 76 . Tompkins Avery . 2014 . “ Asterisk .” TSQ 1 , nos. 1–2 : 26...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2018) 5 (4): 518–539.
Published: 01 November 2018
...*historicities —with an asterisk and in the plural—we wish to push further on Stryker and Aizura's provocation and its implications for thinking about time and the past through the lens of trans. Why historicity ? What does that term and concept offer us that history alone does not? Stryker and Aizura's use...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 November 2014) 1 (4): 539–551.
Published: 01 November 2014
...), Volcano has changed the working title of the series to INTER*ME (pers. comm., April 29, 2014). This new title substitutes inter* for herm and me for body , which personalizes and politicizes the images. Inter* , like trans* , uses the asterisk to designate the widest possible variance, in this...
Journal Article
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (1 May 2019) 6 (2): 223–238.
Published: 01 May 2019
... : 2–3). 3. The author of this article renders gendered nouns and adjectives with an asterisk (*), for example, “aliad*s,” to disrupt the binaries that are built into language. This is difficult to reflect in English translation—I have opted for nongendered language—but should be noted as a...