1-20 of 26 Search Results for

Gender Identity Law in Argentina

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
TSQ (2019) 6 (2): 223–238.
Published: 01 May 2019
.... To know what one will be is to live as dead. —Paul Nizan, La conspiración Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019 Gender Identity Law in Argentina trans interpretation posthumanism queer critique In memory of Mayte Amaya, trans activist , piquetera, and feminist from...
Journal Article
TSQ (2021) 8 (4): 516–531.
Published: 01 November 2021
... of the Argentine trans* movement that in 2012 achieved the enactment of the Gender Identity Law, which recognizes self-perceived gender and mandates private and public health systems to provide free gender-affirmation treatments (Theumer 2020 ). Sixth, Mariela took motherhood beyond the feminist, lesbian...
Journal Article
TSQ (2018) 5 (1): 121–142.
Published: 01 February 2018
... . “ English Translation of Argentina's Gender Identity Law as Approved by the Senate of Argentina on May 8, 2012 .” transactivists.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/argentina-gender-identity-law.pdf . (accessed August 17, 2017 ). Translator's note: In the translated excerpts below, Ms. G...
Journal Article
TSQ (2016) 3 (1-2): 120–136.
Published: 01 May 2016
... passage of the 2012 Gender Identity Law incorporated depathologization at the level of federal legislation ( Salum 2012 ). While providers throughout the world typically require a diagnosis and several letters of approval or support for trans patients seeking gender-confirming care, Argentina's law...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (1-2): 107–110.
Published: 01 May 2014
...* Health Issues in the International Classification of Diseases . transactivists.org/2012/05/20/94 (accessed December 10, 2012 ). GATE—Global Action for Trans* Equality . 2012b . “ English Translation of Argentina's Gender Identity Law as Approved by the Senate of Argentina on May 8, 2012...
Journal Article
TSQ (2019) 6 (2): 194–209.
Published: 01 May 2019
... of trans groups in Chile were also brought up in the interviews, such as the Gender Identity Law, recently passed by the Chilean Congress in September 2018, the improvement of the antidiscrimination law (known as the Zamudio Law and named for a hate crime committed against Daniel Zamudio, a young gay man...
Journal Article
TSQ (2019) 6 (1): 43–63.
Published: 01 February 2019
... in the dialogue, however, were as unrepresentative as in the “Cisminar.” Cis interviewers and Butler presented, among other things, harsh criticisms of Argentina's Gender Identity Law. This law, sanctioned in 2012, was internationally recognized for three main reasons: (1) because it fulfils its objective...
Journal Article
TSQ (2021) 8 (4): 417–425.
Published: 01 November 2021
... and LGBTQ movements in Argentina, Muñoz does not easily fall into the role of beloved trancestor, styling herself as something more like a nationalist transsexual mother to the nation in the wake of years of dictatorship. As the authors write, “Her trajectory defied the limits of cis-gendered...
Journal Article
TSQ (2019) 6 (2): 145–155.
Published: 01 May 2019
... cissexist and heteronormative testimonial archive to include trans and travesti voices. Martín De Mauro Rucovsky's article similarly engages a pivotal moment in Southern Cone history, crafting a genealogy of Argentina's Ley de Identidad de Género (2012), or Gender Identity Law. De Mauro Rucovsky analyzes...
FIGURES
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (1-2): 68–73.
Published: 01 May 2014
... 2013 ), while South Africa, Chile, several European countries, and others are educating government agency workers who handle identification changes (Shlasko, pers. comm., August 2, 2013). In Argentina, where the 2012 landmark Gender Identity Law enabled trans people to change their identification...
Journal Article
TSQ (2018) 5 (4): 621–637.
Published: 01 November 2018
..., a precarious situation, and laws in the 1970s did not guarantee the right to identity of trans individuals writ large. To this day, despite the legality of sex-change operations, Chile does not have a gender identity law (such as Argentina's 2012 Gender Identity Law) to facilitate the civil modification...
FIGURES
Journal Article
TSQ (2019) 6 (3): 338–357.
Published: 01 August 2019
... persons, satisfy all standards and are capable of adhering to the standards associated with their biological sex.” 13. For instance, section 2 of the Argentina Gender Identity Law ( 2012 ), which is considered the gold standard with respect to legislating the right to gender self-determination...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (4): 552–558.
Published: 01 November 2014
... in a different historical and cultural context). Travesti references not only gender identity but also a political and activist identity, one seeking to become the subject of law. The term travesti designates “persons that having being assigned the masculine gender at birth have chosen to identify themselves...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (1-2): 123–125.
Published: 01 May 2014
... of otherness, abject subjects, and/or victims of violence, there have also been increasing opportunities for transgender normativity via state and legal recognition — as with Argentina's Gender Identity Law. Nonnormatively gendered subjects who resist or fail at homo- and gender-normative assimilation, however...
Journal Article
TSQ (2018) 5 (1): 83–99.
Published: 01 February 2018
... and of trans bodies as fake. Examining both legal examples and ethnographic data, the article calls attention to the current attempts to formulate a national gender identity law in Guatemala. Doing so, we discuss trans visibility as contentious. Because of the need for social inclusion, including access...
Journal Article
TSQ (2014) 1 (3): 419–439.
Published: 01 August 2014
... activists—most of them travestis , who where extremely poor sex workers with equally limited access to education. These activists not only challenged legal understandings on trans* issues, they also imagined a revolutionary gender identity law and got that law passed. However, when the first book...
Journal Article
TSQ (2019) 6 (2): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Rolnik's ( 2006 ) perspective, which defines minoritarian becomings as a process that does not essentialize the identities but is performative; that is, one is not essentially minoritarian but becomes so because of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, functional diversity, migration status, and so...
Journal Article
TSQ (2018) 5 (1): 1–8.
Published: 01 February 2018
.... In “Paradoxes of Visibility: The Proposed Guatemalan Gender Identity Law,” activist researchers Alejandra Wundram Pimentel and Mónica Leonardo Segura examine the contradictory demands for invisibility and visibility in pursuit of trans citizenship, and the difficulties these contradictions pose for attempts...
Journal Article
TSQ (2016) 3 (1-2): 104–119.
Published: 01 May 2016
... nation in LGBT rights. She further argued that the proposed Organic Law would be the most advanced legislation in the world with respect to the recognition of trans identity, because unlike Argentina, Colombia, Italy, and Denmark, these new IDs would list gender instead of sex and would not create what...
Journal Article
TSQ (2019) 6 (2): 164–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
... is to hail the other; hence, it is to involve the other in its doing. Thus, if touch is always already trans-, then to transgender touch— transtocar —may release its performative potential, particularly in relation to its ability to undo gender and sexuality as abided and prescribed by the law. 2...
FIGURES