When I first read Hil Malatino's book, I had two strong reactions two it. One was gratefulness that, finally, a scholarly work like this existed, written from the perspective of an intersex person who refused to see their intersex condition as something that concerned only their body. The other was a kind of anachronistic regret that a book like this did not exist twenty years or ten years ago, when I was struggling with questions similar to the ones that inform Malatino's approach, and which surface especially in the brief personal vignettes that connect the chapters of the book.

First and foremost, this book stands out to me because it shows what academic philosophy can be when it dares to step out of its paradigms. Despite some remarkable strides toward inclusiveness and diversity in recent years, queer topics and queer philosophers are...

You do not currently have access to this content.