Gayatri Gopinath's first book, Impossible Desires, published under the Perverse Modernities series of Duke University Press, has become a foundational text in the fields of queer and feminist studies since its publication in 2005. In Impossible Desires, Gopinath problematized the masculinist and heteronormative foundations of studies of the diaspora and its relationship to the nation-state by eloquently demonstrating how these formations cohere around constructions of normative genders and sexualities. Carefully reading queer diasporic bodies and desires, Gopinath conjured not an idyllic homeland of origin frozen in time but multiple and shifting accounts of memory, homeland, exiles, and displacements that were at once an account of colonialism and racism as they were accounts of life making that often exceeded the strictures of heteronormativity.

Gopinath's new book, Unruly Visions, published under the same series, is a continuation of her first book,...

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