Travesti activist Lohana Berkins stands in the foreground, her fist raised in struggle and solidarity (fig. 1). Behind a wave of blood red fabric, a swell of protestors chant, lifting pink and blue signs high above their heads demanding justicia for Diana Sacayán. The hand-painted word compañera peeks out from the fabric's folds, curling across the collective's banner in bold, black cursive outlined in soft baby blue. Compañera—a word thick with complicity, friendship, solidarity, and struggle—manifests the crowd's affective commitments. The banner enfolds the march in a loose, sensuous weave as protestors flood the streets of Buenos Aires denouncing Diana's murder.

One sign in the upper right-hand corner stands out from the rest: painted in black, Diana Sacayán's portrait overlays the pan-indigenous wiphala flag's checkered pattern, framed by the words trava sudaca originaria. Diana's singular self-identification defies easy...

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