Questions of time and chronology have risen to the forefront of scholarship in queer and trans studies in recent years.1 Carolyn Dinshaw has advocated for anachronistic “touches” across time, Roderick Ferguson has envisioned queer “palimpsests with residues of earlier discourses and histories,” and C. Riley Snorton has highlighted intersections of blackness and trans as a condition of temporal possibility—as “movement with no clear origin and no point of arrival” (Dinshaw 1999; Dinshaw et al. 2007: 180; Snorton 2017: 2). Beyond this, a wave of new conferences and publications has explored “trans temporalities,” further demonstrating how methods of accounting for and thinking through time have become increasingly relevant to scholarship on trans subjects (e.g., Lau 2016; Fisher, Phillips, and Katri 2017).2 In an influential essay, Kadji Amin has welcomed this “critical focus on the temporal underpinnings...

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