“How noisy everything grows”: This quotation by Karl Kraus serves as epigraph for Walter Benjamin's essay “Karl Kraus” (2005: 433), a profile of the journalist in which Benjamin advances his own theory on eros, modernity, and the circulation of information. This essay was published in 1931, five years before “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” (Benjamin 1968), where Benjamin's triangulation of sensory perception, aesthetics, and the political really converge. This is one way to understand what is at stake in Meg Day's award-winning book of poems Last Psalm at Sea Level, which offers the reader a new relationship to the relational and political possibilities of sound, through psalms of grief, psalms of optimism, psalms of distress and rescue, of kinship, gender, and the body. Deceptively pastoral, these poems in fact can be read...

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