William Polk’s Crusade and Jihad attempts to tell the story of what he calls “the thousand year war between the Muslim World and the Global North.” He wisely begins with a quote from Eric Hobsbawm’s essay “The Short 20th Century.” Hobsbawm writes, “the destruction of the past is one of the most characteristic and eerie phenomenon of the late 20th century. More young men and women at the century’s end grow up in a sort of permanent present lacking any organic relation to the public past of the times they live in.” Polk has made an important contribution by reclaiming the relationship between North and South, a story he tells with mastery of the neocolonial analysis of that ongoing encounter, yet avoiding the kind of guilt-ridden worship of the oppressed that often distorts contemporary Western sensibilities. The expansion of Muslim power over most of...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.