Teshuvah, or repentance, in the Jewish tradition, is most often practiced during the days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, but is, in fact, appropriate at all times. While doing my own personal work in this regard, I was led to turn my attention to my profession, that of medicine and health care.

Since the revelations of torture at Abu Ghraib, and most recently, since the US Senate Intelligence Committee on Torture made public its report in December 2014, physicians have spoken out against the role of doctors in the implementation of torture. It is a sensitive issue for the profession, and most physicians are aghast at such obvious trespass of the most basic standard of medical ethics, to “do no harm.” They see themselves in a moral and ethical universe wholly apart from that of those doctors who have actively participated in...

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