In today’s world, our lives are systematically fragmented and our relationships are transactional. When we try to put the pieces back together, we call it an intersectional analysis. However, the heart of the matter involves more than identifying intersections between different forms of oppression: it involves healing a broken vision and recovering our wholeness.

I used to work for a non-profit organization addressing domestic violence in South Asian communities. Time after time, when survivors of violence called the helpline, they didn’t just want advice and assistance, they also wanted to tell their stories. But soon, the intake process took over. Each helpline advocate had a form to fill out, a series of questions grouped within neat categories. Soon, survivors told fewer narratives and responded more to specific questions. By the fourth or fifth time they called, they were spitting responses to questions that...

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