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hamm

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Journal Article
Theater (1968) 1 (1): 88–92.
Published: 01 February 1968
..., Hamm and Clov, playing the Andre Gregory's visiting production final game of their life together, namely, of Samuel Beckett's Endgame, starring dying. Endgames, final games, posit David Hurst and Ron Leibman, was earlier...
Journal Article
Theater (1984) 15 (3): 54–57.
Published: 01 November 1984
... that the spectator experiences is the thematic blind and crippled. Nagg and Nell, who are Beckett’s Endgame for the Group Animation intent that lies behind Marcel Delval’s use of Hamm’s parents - Hamm was also the name Thestre last June in Brussels, his choice of the building. When Clov (‘John Dobrynine...
Journal Article
Theater (1999) 29 (3): 85–95.
Published: 01 November 1999
... narrator plays a part even as she or he disbe- lieves the scenario. If counterapocalypse reveals anything, it does so “in ironic mimesis of the portentous tones of the original- with whom it dances as it wrestles.”s Beckett begins Endgame by making Hamm think out loud, and (as Nietzsche would have...
Journal Article
Theater (1985) 16 (2): 87–92.
Published: 01 May 1985
... have seen of the script’s pxedgaze, tonelessly, which directs the actor not to speak ani- En&ume by Samuel Beckett, directed by JoAnne Akalaitis. Clov (John Bottoms, left) and Hamm matedly but is also a bit...
Journal Article
Theater (1978) 10 (1): 90–93.
Published: 01 February 1978
... also - Hamm is blind and I couldn't use was no satisfactory Pozzo. "And really His next play, Endgame, he dedicated to my eyes, I couldn't budge from my arm• there was a kind of work done which Blin. "I was very...
Journal Article
Theater (1985) 16 (3): 81–84.
Published: 01 November 1985
.... last! * The titles are subtly ironic: one might ex- pect a play called Thedre I to resemble a late Unlike Hamm and Clov, A and B have never work such as That Tim, but both Thater I met before and we watch their first...
Journal Article
Theater (1986) 18 (1): 70–73.
Published: 01 February 1986
... tion, the three of us will languish there Hamm asks Clov for “a few words” to insistence on constantly weakening on the hillside. Is translation possible? sum up at the end of Endgame, Clov himself (he claims the French language In whom can we place our faith? responds with a sarcastic...
Journal Article
Theater (1999) 29 (3): 7–40.
Published: 01 November 1999
... and remaking of the world characteristic of modernist poetics. It reenacts apocalyptic rup- ture in language, in narrative, in its cosmic landscape, and in its very dramatic structure (for every dramatic structure is a modeling of history and a telling of myth). HAMM: And the horizon? Nothing...
Journal Article
Theater (1984) 16 (1): 40–42.
Published: 01 February 1984
... more enthusiastic. In Cleveland, however, they didn’t You once said you were pleased to be his understudy in Mwter want to see this play; they didn’t see what we had to do with them. HamM. The reception was thunderous in Minneapolis. In San Francisco, Yes. however, we might as well not have been...
Journal Article
Theater (2000) 30 (1): 49–55.
Published: 01 February 2000
.... His repertory of roles included countless classics until in 1957 he was cast as Hamm in the German-language premiere of Endgame, and he became hooked on Beckett. He Minetti as Faust played Krapp twice in very different productions. He played Pozzo in a production...
Journal Article
Theater (2012) 42 (2): 7–25.
Published: 01 May 2012
...], and as such requires that this last extremity of human meat — or bones — be there, thinking and stumbling and sweating, under our noses, like Clov and Hamm, but gone from refuge.8 Beckett’s critics have frequently followed him in insisting on the lengths to which he insisted on keeping “our genres...
Journal Article
Theater (1990) 21 (3): 57–61.
Published: 01 November 1990
..., including the mysterious “Captain 12-pack,” a street schemes. person, who wears a “Hamm’s Beer” carton over his head. At a carnival side show, Lloyd as the barker pitches The Twin Cities audiences adored 21-A with its mixture hairy Bob as “Bobaloo the Beast Child from Borneo,” but of local...
Journal Article
Theater (1999) 29 (3): 153–166.
Published: 01 November 1999
... disappearance is final and irrevocable-Godot will never arrive, we know this, and there will be no miracles in Hamm’s sunken bunker- and this total loss marks his play worlds as postapocalyptic. In Prior’s account, on the other hand, God is not dead but off wandering, “sail[ing] off on Voyages...
Journal Article
Theater (1968) 1 (1): 78–87.
Published: 01 February 1968
... Estragon, Hamm, or Krapp, place, and action, is obsolete for the he was made by his dramatist to seethat rather obvious reason that the mirror real life occurred within the infinite held up to nature shows no unity in spaces of his brain. The dentist's appoint- 79 ment...
Journal Article
Theater (1985) 17 (1): 70–77.
Published: 01 February 1985
... fribbling away whatever’s left and Beckett’s helpless tyrant, the Hamm of Endgame. Bill’s slow, grist for the mill fading sentence is also Beckettian. The music he listens to is properly meat for the chopper...
Journal Article
Theater (1969) 2 (2): 8–21.
Published: 01 May 1969
... production, Fall, 1966): Ron Leibman and David Hurst as Clov and Hamm. 19 In our own time, what would be the status of Waiting for Godot, if we did not believe it rendered a state of soul which is that of an epoch...
Journal Article
Theater (2006) 36 (2): 95–102.
Published: 01 May 2006
...- ing its grieving moments as something like a prophecy of Lear; the King Lear (1962) itself with Scofield offering a baleful prophecy of Hamm and Krapp; Peter Weiss’s Marat/Sade (1964), as Brook’s demonstration that he could create theatrical shock pro...
Journal Article
Theater (2006) 36 (2): 103–110.
Published: 01 May 2006
...- ing its grieving moments as something like a prophecy of Lear; the King Lear (1962) itself with Scofield offering a baleful prophecy of Hamm and Krapp; Peter Weiss’s Marat/Sade (1964), as Brook’s demonstration that he could create theatrical shock pro...