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Journal Article
Theater (2014) 44 (2): 21–29.
Published: 01 May 2014
... discourse” in the presentation of contemporary performance, he points to the affinities that performance curation maintains with dramaturgy and criticism, even as the role stakes a claim to greater institutional and creative power. © 2014 by Yale School of Drama/Yale Repertory Theatre 2014 Truth...
Journal Article
Theater (1994) 25 (2): 24–41.
Published: 01 May 1994
...? Was it true? At that time, John Fuegi's Brecht & Company had not yet come out, though its claims were generally known by academic Brechtians (and had been prefigured in his own earlier publications). Other research on Elisabeth Hauptmann inter alia had already appeared, in the Brecht Yearbook...
Journal Article
Theater (2019) 49 (2): 88–103.
Published: 01 May 2019
... interprets his Satanic approach to the hells of contemporary existence in Miltonic terms: suffering can be fleetingly transfigured through dream, ritual, and desire. For Findlay, claims Friedman, the theater proposes a redemptive power in which even “Lucifer is a love angel.” Jim Findlay 9/11 Electric...
Journal Article
Theater (2020) 50 (2): 5–19.
Published: 01 May 2020
...Dana Tanner-Kennedy Dana Tanner-Kennedy stakes a claim for an unacknowledged category of contemporary American theater: postsecular theater. She argues that religious belief becomes a matter of choice in a postsecular era that struggles between post-truth reality and transcendental belief. Through...
Journal Article
Theater (2019) 49 (3): 119–131.
Published: 01 November 2019
... 10.1215/01610775-7856677 © 2019 by Jackson Polys polys 120 And what for those on the Right, hiding under a cloak of attachments, claiming to know what s left, what s worth preserving? What paths remain, blazed trails, when those who claim to acknowledge real- ity are those who commit crimes against...
Journal Article
Theater (2021) 51 (3): 2–3.
Published: 01 November 2021
... with myself and with the rhetoric of produc- 2 up front tivity that has crept into my subconscious. A combination of the myth of genius and the late capitalist drive for constant production, well-i­ntentioned claims for the economic productivity of theater, and the extension of that desired productivity...
Journal Article
Theater (2010) 40 (3): 55–65.
Published: 01 November 2010
..., not one single event but an unorderly conglomeration of singular events which as a fight were chaotic, “ultra-­realistic” (as one of the profes- sional reenactors says), “scary,” and “fantastic.”2 Unsettling in any reenactment is the double ­bind of, on the one hand, claiming more direct...
Journal Article
Theater (2023) 53 (2): 52–55.
Published: 01 May 2023
... and reality) are very narrow. It is impossible to tell in Fuck Me how much is fiction and how much of what is shared or performed exceeds that dimension. Is she really called Marina for the reasons she claims? Did she really have a grandfather who was a part of the last military dictatorship of Argentina...
Journal Article
Theater (2008) 38 (3): 5–21.
Published: 01 November 2008
... tensions but on a much larger stage. Producers, writers, and performers who claim to celebrate sensual pleasure, political empowerment, and relaxed racial tensions have encountered a host of foes. These include, but are not limited to, Catholic university administrators, feminists, CBS, the Federal...
Journal Article
Theater (1999) 29 (3): 71–84.
Published: 01 November 1999
..., the “chronically ill”. . . But it may be that he simply made too much noise at night, per- forming breathing rituals and shrieking at the top of his voice. He claimed these were part of his actor’s training, that he was a well-known actor, poet, critic, dramaturg, an obvious delusion of grandeur. He also...
Journal Article
Theater (2007) 37 (2): 117–120.
Published: 01 May 2007
... of transportation, wardrobe, or sites of employment or entertainment. But this was not always so. In the first half of the twentieth century — at the height of modernism — many artists, designers, and architects had grand and idealistic visions. It was claimed, for instance, that in 1930 a person going out...
Journal Article
Theater (2007) 37 (2): 121–124.
Published: 01 May 2007
... of transportation, wardrobe, or sites of employment or entertainment. But this was not always so. In the first half of the twentieth century — at the height of modernism — many artists, designers, and architects had grand and idealistic visions. It was claimed, for instance, that in 1930 a person going out...
Journal Article
Theater (2007) 37 (2): 125–129.
Published: 01 May 2007
.... It was claimed, for instance, that in 1930 a person going out for an evening’s enter- tainment could leave his or her house, ride in a car to a restaurant, see a show in a theater, go to a nightclub, and end the night in a hotel, all designed by Joseph Urban. Somewhat similar claims might have been made...
Journal Article
Theater (2007) 37 (2): 130–135.
Published: 01 May 2007
... means of transportation, wardrobe, or sites of employment or entertainment. But this was not always so. In the first half of the twentieth century — at the height of modernism — many artists, designers, and architects had grand and idealistic visions. It was claimed, for instance, that in 1930...
Journal Article
Theater (1988) 19 (2): 35–38.
Published: 01 May 1988
... of his artistic have never been resolved and which are the motors of decline. The suspect nature of Brook’s shifting point of view his art. is particularly glaring in the light of his recurring cultish claim...
Journal Article
Theater (1969) 2 (2): 8–21.
Published: 01 May 1969
... is the greatest literary genre. How, though, can these claims be tested? Are they really anything more than heartfelt compliments, rhetorical expres- sions of enthusiasm, and applicable, with appropriate changes, to any art that takes one's fancy? It seems to me that preference of one art...
Journal Article
Theater (1986) 17 (3): 107.
Published: 01 November 1986
...? elaborate on at least one ofmy claims, name• In regard to my own memoir of Brecht, I ly, that in his book Brecht in Exile(1983) Bruce did not make any use ofthe FBI records that Cook twists Bernhard Reich's description of I am aware ofexcept on one point that in no Brecht's collaborative work methods...
Journal Article
Theater (1986) 17 (3): 107.
Published: 01 November 1986
...? elaborate on at least one ofmy claims, name• In regard to my own memoir of Brecht, I ly, that in his book Brecht in Exile(1983) Bruce did not make any use ofthe FBI records that Cook twists Bernhard Reich's description of I am aware ofexcept on one point that in no Brecht's collaborative work methods...
Journal Article
Theater (1988) 19 (3): 70–71.
Published: 01 November 1988
... reconnect, to reassemble and gird ments, the three plays are immersed in no injury. up for the next battle to which they a sense of mystery that transgresses the -from “The Chimney Sweeper” could claim both victim and ten confinements of rigid realism...
Journal Article
Theater (2010) 40 (3): 67–68.
Published: 01 November 2010
... for advertising. Our psychic space, our thinking being saturated by brands all around us. Does this hide a “truer” self? If so how might we begin to claim space back? It became a theatrical challenge. Could we turn the simulacrum into something live? In other words, could we make theater? Rather than...