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abjection

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Journal Article
Theater (2019) 49 (2): 4–29.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Ann Liv Young, and Robert Woodruff, Bruin combines Benjamin, Aristotle, and the art criticism of Hal Foster, using theory to illuminate how the depiction of abjection, what Aristotle called “the scene of suffering,” prepares the spectator for end-times and civilizational...
Journal Article
Theater (1999) 29 (3): 71–84.
Published: 01 November 1999
... was a respectable librarian by day and an abject sexual ecstatic by night, debasing himself with studious application in expensive bordellos. He was known as a sulfurous writer and philosopher, a strange mix of Hegel and Jack the Ripper. He was also a leftist of a strange kind. He believed in revolution...
Journal Article
Theater (2017) 47 (1): 3–15.
Published: 01 February 2017
... the potential to cross over or tour. We need August Wilson to tell stories about us and play on Broadway; we want Bill T. Jones to make work about racism that allows museums and wealthy white audiences to learn about black abjection through dance. But does this work in these venues amplify pos...
Journal Article
Theater (2017) 47 (1): 139–161.
Published: 01 February 2017
.... Does it suggest color blindness and the perception of the abject nude performing body (black or white) as a neutral body — simply a trend in the narrative development and evolution of art form? Or does it suggest a refusal to acknowledge the resurgence of the black body in crisis, where nudity...
Journal Article
Theater (2004) 34 (2): 11–13.
Published: 01 May 2004
... of critique, because only abject love can embarrass everyone: its subject, its object, and especially its audience. In the twenty-first century, where nothing is less hip than the Beltway, the masque’s pandering to power, its outrageous patriotism, its commitment to mythologizing the ruler at every turn...
Journal Article
Theater (1987) 18 (2): 34–36.
Published: 01 May 1987
...; he does not stand well back Theater photography is allowed a lax- responsibility for action. The world pic- into the house. He aligns himself with ity of conviction and abject func- tured is complete in time and space and the players, claiming privilege above the tionalism that is not tolerated...
Journal Article
Theater (2020) 50 (2): 63–77.
Published: 01 May 2020
..., an almost abject character. Most transgressive appears the sight of humans performing the movement of dogs. We see them sniffing, pawing, cocking their legs. The presence of these animals reminds us of suffering. Not only because suffering makes animals of humans and humanizes animals. For Auden, dogs...
Journal Article
Theater (2003) 33 (3): 132–134.
Published: 01 November 2003
... and submitting to humiliation— comment perhaps on the fadingof an ideal that there’s no nadir to the abjection and certainly once promised deliverance. With bracing can- no sense that self-sacriŽce will lead to absolu- dor, Foreman admits that he no longer knows...
Journal Article
Theater (2003) 33 (3): 135–137.
Published: 01 November 2003
... and submitting to humiliation— comment perhaps on the fadingof an ideal that there’s no nadir to the abjection and certainly once promised deliverance. With bracing can- no sense that self-sacriŽce will lead to absolu- dor, Foreman admits that he no longer knows...
Journal Article
Theater (2003) 33 (3): 138–141.
Published: 01 November 2003
... and submitting to humiliation— comment perhaps on the fadingof an ideal that there’s no nadir to the abjection and certainly once promised deliverance. With bracing can- no sense that self-sacriŽce will lead to absolu- dor, Foreman admits that he no longer knows...
Journal Article
Theater (2007) 37 (3): 73–85.
Published: 01 November 2007
... and self-denying, or backslide into abjection as whores, vampires, succubi. Easily compatible with reactionary politics and religious orthodoxy, idealism maintained its stranglehold on the European imagination well into the twentieth cen- tury, informing the selection of the first Nobel laureates...
Journal Article
Theater (2017) 47 (2): 9–21.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of subjection, sites of coercion, sites of abject neglect and impoverished possibility. By way of rank comparison, your structured accumulations or task-­based works are incredibly empty and flat to us, something like what children might do before they understand the impossibility of sticking to a plan...
Journal Article
Theater (1999) 29 (3): 100–114.
Published: 01 November 1999
... community.” So even when passion, violence, abjection occur, they are softened in this mise-en-sckne: no explosion into melodrama or carnival or farce or tragedy is allowed. Only the gentle accumulation of unchanging, drifting scenes that slowly incorporate the twentieth- century characters...
Journal Article
Theater (2017) 47 (2): 67–99.
Published: 01 May 2017
... stage-­right wall. They stand looking at each other who did not belong to their small tribe. These for a moment. charly looks nervous. The screen are the most abject and miserable creatures now has two units...
Journal Article
Theater (1997) 27 (2_and_3): 96–136.
Published: 01 May 1997
..., withering in his rage, JO at us, in his desperate, irremediable Don’t you want a family, children? Don’t abjection. you want to pass on to the next generation what you care about? Don’t you want to LI N D SAY...
Journal Article
Theater (2015) 45 (2): 115–147.
Published: 01 May 2015
... by Emilyn’s note. Adorable. Overnight I had become an adorable person. Not that I had been abject before, annoying, vile, boring. No. I’ve always been very interesting behind my good manners and predictability. But now I had become adorable. Adorable. Adorable for letting her fill my ears...
Journal Article
Theater (1985) 16 (2): 6–17.
Published: 01 May 1985
.... That is something basically unheard of in the West, where the You walked in and you were handed an envelope, the kind of democratic role is abject. envelope used for a hneral invitation. The program was an invita- This notion that the artist is a prophet is most deeply...
Journal Article
Theater (2001) 31 (1): 107–127.
Published: 01 February 2001
... in abject conditions that do not seem to represent an appreciably “better” life than the poverty they have left back home. What is dehumanizing is not just the blatant ways in which...
Journal Article
Theater (2020) 50 (1): 63–91.
Published: 01 February 2020
... racism, white privilege. The work stretches and pulls outside of itself, con- stantly brushing through the world and social lives as impossibilities not to be taken for granted but rather as sites of subjection, sites of coercion, sites of abject neglect and impoverished possibility. By way of rank...
Journal Article
Theater (1987) 19 (1): 50–69.
Published: 01 February 1987
... Lord alone. . . naked, covered in mud and Jesus Christ, I know it’s all wrong to be hurting . . apicture of abject misery.) down on my knees praying to you in a Scene IV...