In this article, John Houchin, author of Censorship of the American Theater in the Twentieth Century, continues his exploration of censorship and its social ramifications. In censorship battles throughout history, debates may have been addressed in two or three newspaper articles, only to fade quickly from public view. Houchin argues the swift proliferation of internet and cable communication has protracted these debates, placing even greater pressure on artists, producers, and regulatory agencies. Houchin explores the impact of censorship vis-à-vis four events, events that all revolve around women and the presentation of the female body: Eve Ensler's The Vagina Monologues, Janet Jackson's “wardrobe malfunction” at the 2004 Super Bowl, Don Imus' defamatory comments about the Rutgers women's basketball team, and the play My Name is Rachel Corrie, compiled from the late activist's emails, letters, and journals.

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