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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2008) 117 (1): 99–117.
Published: 01 January 2008
...Jeffrey C. King Complex demonstratives (in the singular) are noun phrases that result from combining the determiners `this' or `that' with syntactically simple or complex common noun phrases such as `woman' or `woman who is taking her skis off'. Thus, `this woman', and `that woman who is taking her...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (4): 582–584.
Published: 01 October 2004
... of the Maternal-Fetal Conflict. Oxford and Portland, Ore.: Hart Publishing, 2002. Pp. xxxv, 437. Suppose a woman chooses to carry a pregnancy to term. What duties should she be understood to have with respect to the fetus? If she is informed that a vaginal delivery will pose significant risks to its life...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (1): 1–30.
Published: 01 January 2004
... contradiction like (8) That woman is not a woman, or an apparent truism like (9) That woman is a woman, and think of the assertive utterance of such a sentence in a situation in which a speaker wants to say that his demonstration does (not) pick out a woman. For example, imagine (8) or (9...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2020) 129 (2): 159–210.
Published: 01 April 2020
... talented enough to do that. She can, however, be a decent philosopher. So she chooses that path, and—perhaps with time—comes to prefer it over others, the music one included. A young woman grows up in a highly conservative society—perhaps in South Asia 23 —where it is common for women to malnourish...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (4): 577–582.
Published: 01 October 2004
...) Rosamund Scott, Rights, Duties and the Body: Law and Ethics of the Maternal-Fetal Conflict. Oxford and Portland, Ore.: Hart Publishing, 2002. Pp. xxxv, 437. Suppose a woman chooses to carry a pregnancy to term. What duties should she be understood to have with respect to the fetus? If she...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (3): 427–431.
Published: 01 July 2004
... a blindsighter who can reliably point to the person a normally sighted speaker is talking about whenever she uses the expression ‘that woman’. Even if the blindsighter points correctly all the time, she does not understand the speaker’s use of ‘that woman’. Common sense (according to Campbell) thus finds...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (4): 584–587.
Published: 01 October 2004
... that the assistance to the fetus would be provided by means of an intrusion on the woman’s body is morally relevant. But there is a natural objection to Scott’s appeal to this fact that she nowhere seems to consider: if a woman has already carried a pregnancy to term, then regardless of whether the fetus ends up...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2019) 128 (2): 228–232.
Published: 01 April 2019
... in isolation from the works from which they were extracted, and from the context in which they emerged. This collection contributes to the history of philosophy so conceived and attempts to add Wollstonecraft as a token “great woman” by demonstrating her relevance for contemporary social and political debates...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 415–448.
Published: 01 October 2006
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (3): 422–426.
Published: 01 July 2004
... to originate, the sex-gender distinction. Gatens analyzes distinctions between female, femi- nine, and woman in an original, interesting way and finally argues in favor of Natalie Stoljar’s suggestion that woman is a “cluster concept,” based on Wit- tgenstein’s notion of family resemblances (279–80). Some...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2005) 114 (1): 131–135.
Published: 01 January 2005
... versions, I think it must be true of them, too. Consider, for instance, Smith’s final account of the distinction between weakness and compulsion: We begin by abstracting away from all those properties that could have an effect on what the weak woman and the compulsive woman desire except...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 251–266.
Published: 01 April 2007
... in his sleep about “Nancy.” She wonders whether Nancy is a woman or perhaps a mathematical object (for example, a cer- tain Lie group). Suppose it is in fact a group but that the wife suspects it is a woman and wonders whether her husband is having an affair with this woman. Consider...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2020) 129 (1): 53–94.
Published: 01 January 2020
... where the meaning of the name intuitively covaries with some antecedent, typically an indefinite determiner phrase. For example, consider the uses of the names in (21) and (22) below. (21) If a child is christened ‘Bambi’, Disney will sue Bambi's parents. ( Geurts 1997: 321 ) (22) Every woman who...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2020) 129 (3): 395–431.
Published: 01 July 2020
... Consider the following case: R acist D inner T able : Nour, a young British woman of Arab descent, is invited to dinner at the home of a white friend from university. The host, Nour’s friend’s father, is polite and welcoming to Nour. He is generous with the food and wine, and asks Nour a series...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (1): 121–123.
Published: 01 January 2003
..., and thereby fits the widest set of cases. In chapter 5, on legal issues, Crouch rejects the “reasonable woman stan- 122 BOOK REVIEWS dard” as unnecessary and insufficient. She argues that it is unnecessary since she believes...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2017) 126 (2): 219–240.
Published: 01 April 2017
... in 2016’, ‘The Zora residing in Pasadena’, and so on. With a mind-set like Colin's, she walks the world on the lookout for Zoras. One day, upon spying a woman sporting a certain name necklace, she exclaims [16] I've just got to talk to the Zora about who she was named after. Because her knowledge...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2014) 123 (1): 112–116.
Published: 01 January 2014
..., or lead to secondary effects like crime and drug use, then privacy should be mandated. Touching seems to be an important condition for Allen because “unless the woman is touched or confined, she cannot be overpowered” (91). Situations in which a dancer could be overpowered or physically controlled...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2013) 122 (4): 647–650.
Published: 01 October 2013
... for not acting toward them in the proper manner—presumably not showing them the respect that he would have shown a white woman (see Joël Michel, Le Lynchage aux États Unis [Paris: Le Table Ronde, 2008]). Arguably, we have on the part of these women a betrayal whose moral callousness far exceeded...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (2): 135–189.
Published: 01 April 2003
... her. A decade later he suffers a special kind of memory loss. He can recall everything that happened to him up until a few years before their relationship started, but nothing after. We would not expect him to love her, and indeed it is hard to see how he could. To him, she is no longer the woman...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2013) 122 (4): 577–617.
Published: 01 October 2013
... by the quantifier, even if the pronoun is singular: (29) Every woman will stand when she is speaking. Now, ‘she’ here can be read as referring to a single woman as it does in the unquantified case, but it can also be read as bound by the quantified ‘every woman’. Third, this latter reading, where...