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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2014) 123 (3): 360–366.
Published: 01 July 2014
... and 2004; and Rini and Cresswell 2012 . 2. See Olson 1997 . 3. If I am being really careful about my credences, I should probably try to make sure that the sum of my credence that I will be Sili-Brain and my credence that I will be Tele-Product is less than or equal to 1. But doing so...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2001) 110 (4): 600–603.
Published: 01 October 2001
.... This is a highly ambitious and stimulating paper that mounts a serious challenge to a number of assumptions about the place of tele- ology in early modern thought. According to conventional wisdom, Descartes set the ball rolling by suggesting, in a sly attempt to combine physics and piety, that teleology had...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (2): 284–288.
Published: 01 April 2004
... by going over some results of psychological experiments on helping and destructive behavior. According to Isen and Levin (1972), 87.5% of those par- ticipants who had just found a dime in the coin return slot of a public tele- phone helped a confederate (of the experimenter) who “accidentally” dropped...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (4): 447–482.
Published: 01 October 2003
... explain how there exists a norm of correctness for belief by turning to the fact that belief aims at the truth. Thinking of truth as the aim of belief typically involves attempting to account for the normative relation between belief and truth along tele- ological lines. If belief aims at the truth...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2001) 110 (2): 151–197.
Published: 01 April 2001
... conclusions that could be verified using methods that his contemporaries, including his critics, would accept. Looking towards a distant building, they could use the tele- scope to read the letters carved into the stone facade, and verify their judgments by going closer to look. Pointing...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 105–107.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele- ology: “we must look for concepts that enable us actively to interpret things rather than passively to undergo them” (85). This discussion of action-guiding concepts leads Moore to his second...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 108–112.
Published: 01 January 2006
...; to respond to whatever befalls us, both by making sense of it and, correlatively, by making sense in the face of it” (79). Ideally, any resulting maxims will (formally) avoid practical contradiction, but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 112–115.
Published: 01 January 2006
...; to respond to whatever befalls us, both by making sense of it and, correlatively, by making sense in the face of it” (79). Ideally, any resulting maxims will (formally) avoid practical contradiction, but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 January 2006
...; to respond to whatever befalls us, both by making sense of it and, correlatively, by making sense in the face of it” (79). Ideally, any resulting maxims will (formally) avoid practical contradiction, but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 118–121.
Published: 01 January 2006
...; to respond to whatever befalls us, both by making sense of it and, correlatively, by making sense in the face of it” (79). Ideally, any resulting maxims will (formally) avoid practical contradiction, but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 121–124.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele- ology: “we must look for concepts that enable us actively to interpret things rather than passively to undergo them” (85). This discussion of action-guiding concepts leads Moore to his second...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 124–127.
Published: 01 January 2006
...; to respond to whatever befalls us, both by making sense of it and, correlatively, by making sense in the face of it” (79). Ideally, any resulting maxims will (formally) avoid practical contradiction, but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 127–131.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele- ology: “we must look for concepts that enable us actively to interpret things rather than passively to undergo them” (85). This discussion of action-guiding concepts leads Moore to his second...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 131–133.
Published: 01 January 2006
...; to respond to whatever befalls us, both by making sense of it and, correlatively, by making sense in the face of it” (79). Ideally, any resulting maxims will (formally) avoid practical contradiction, but also (mate- rially) include concepts that allow us to make sense of things. This is bald tele...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2011) 120 (3): 383–421.
Published: 01 July 2011
... construes deliberation as a type of inquiry whereby we uncover causal pathways that lead from the desired end back to us, that is, to an act that appears to be in our power: We deliberate not about ends, but about what promotes ends [ta pros ta tele A doctor, for instance, does...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (3): 339–393.
Published: 01 July 2003
... in order to ␾, he acts with the intention of doing ␾ (cf. Anscombe 1963, §§13–14, 22). It is a striking fact that we can describe this kind of tele- ology in several ways. Suppose that I am typing these words in order to finish section 3 of this paper by Thursday, since that is what I intend to do...