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surgeon

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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2011) 120 (3): 337–382.
Published: 01 July 2011
...) and Vranas (2007) deny that Jones acts wrongly in NEURO- SURGEON. 16. When I say that the latter person’s moral obligation explains why the former person’s action has the moral status that it has, I mean that the latter person’s moral obligation is a crucial, necessary part of the complete explanation...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2004) 113 (3): 411–416.
Published: 01 July 2004
... is “elusive.” There certainly are cases of elusive freedom. Beebee describes one: at the age of 12, I may be free to become a surgeon by the age of 30; but by the age of 25, it may no longer be in my power to become a surgeon by the age of 30. Can we maintain that all freedom is elusive in this sense...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2002) 111 (2): 235–241.
Published: 01 April 2002
.... As a feigned Lewis-style compatibilist, I hold that even if determinism is true, I was probably—that is to say, so far as I know—able, when I was twelve years old, to become a surgeon by the age of thirty. By the time I was, say, twenty-five, I had lost that ability: cir- cumstances were such that I could...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2001) 110 (4): 645–650.
Published: 01 October 2001
... is rather to invent a new way of looking at language that does not lure us into skeptical worries. He says Putnam’s objection is no less misplaced than a complaint to the effect that the surgeon operating on my daughter treats her as a mere assemblage of tissues. No matter how counterin- tuitive...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2016) 125 (4): 451–472.
Published: 01 October 2016
..., from both your and her point of view, of your killing her and a 5/6 chance of your saving her life. Those odds sound good to you and her. Why not push? A reply: “Because then you run a risk of killing her!” True, but this is exactly the sort of thing that brave surgeons do. They operate...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (3): 289–337.
Published: 01 July 2003
... What is “the right kind of way”? Parfit imagines that a surgeon changes brain states that underlie memory traces. The surgeon con- nects these changes with brain states in another person that underlie the other person’s experience. Causal continuity is supposed to pre...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 79–103.
Published: 01 January 2006
.... If the devices work as expected on brains, this is strong empirical evidence that there are no new forces that make a physical difference in or around brains. I’m no brain surgeon, but I think that’s the way the evidence goes. But perhaps there’s another kind of downward causation that doesn’t...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 1–50.
Published: 01 January 2006
... perhaps imagine circumstances in which such a shooting would not cause death — for example, the victim is in a state-of-the-art hospital with the world’s best heart surgeon who is ready to implant an artifi cial heart — such circumstances are very uncommon and seem far-fetched. For some very large...